Policy Directory by Glossary Terms

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Definition
A Note

The definitions used in this policy mirror those in the applicable federal or state regulations.


Abandoned Property

All private property left unclaimed that is not owned by the University.

Abused or Neglected Child

As defined in the Code of Virginia §63.2-100, any child under 18 years of age whose parent or any person responsible for his or her care:

  • Causes or threatens to cause a non-accidental physical or mental injury;
  • Creates a substantial risk of death, disfigurement or impairment of bodily or mental functions;
  • Has a child present during the manufacture of a controlled substance or during the unlawful sale of such substance where such activity would constitute a felony violation;
  • Neglects or refuses to provide adequate food, clothing, shelter, emotional nurturing, or health care;
  • Abandons the child;
  • Neglects or refuses to provide adequate supervision in relation to a child’s age and level of development;
  • Knowingly leaves a child alone in the same dwelling with a person, not related by blood or marriage, who has been convicted of an offense against a minor for which registration is required as a violent sexual offender; or
  • Commits or allows to be committed any illegal sexual act upon a child, including incest, rape, indecent exposure, prostitution, or allows a child to be used in any sexually explicit visual material.
Academic Accommodation

Extension of the normative time limitations associated with a degree program.

Academic Activity or Activities (Usual)

As defined by U.S. laws and regulations (8 CFR 214.8), includes but is not limited to lecturing, consulting, attending meetings, or otherwise sharing knowledge, experience, or skills in master classes, readings, and performances (when the audience is composed of non-paying students and/or open to the general public and general admission tickets to the public have not been sold).

Academic Areas

Schools and units reporting to the executive vice president and provost.

Academic Center or Institute

An organization (other than an academic department or administrative unit) formed within a school or a unit reporting to the Office of the Executive Vice President and Provost, or as a collaborative initiative involving more than one school or unit, to enhance the educational, research, and/or service missions of the University. Organizations formed outside a school or unit reporting to the Office of the Executive Vice President and Provost are also considered an academic center or institute if their activities will involve academic faculty members and their mission is to enhance the educational, research, and/or service missions of the University.

Academic Dean (Dean)

The chief administrator of an academic school at the University and the University Librarian.

Academic Decision

A decision made by a faculty member or an individual acting in his/her official capacity at the University that affects a student’s academic standing or performance. Academic decisions include, but are not limited to, academic probation and suspension and denial of requests to return to the University before the end of the period of suspension as defined by the school. Academic decisions do not include decisions regarding admission to the University, transfer from one school to another within the University, admission to a particular major or program of study, decisions made by the Honor or Judiciary Committees, any grading decision or determination of grading criteria or course requirements (see “Grade Changes” in Related Information below), or allegations of professional misconduct unrelated to a student’s academic standing or performance.

Academic Department

Department offering academic, for-credit programs of study, usually leading to a degree. For the purposes of this policy, academic department also refers to the department or school in which the faculty member holds an academic tenured appointment.

Academic Employment

All faculty positions classified as academic, including tenured and tenure-track faculty members, as well as non-tenure-track faculty engaged primarily in teaching or research activities and faculty wage employees hired in accordance with policy PROV-026, Faculty Wage Employment.

Academic Faculty

All tenure-track and tenured faculty members, as well as non-tenure- track faculty members whose teaching or research responsibilities constitute at least 50% of their position.

Academic General Faculty Members

General Faculty Members whose primary responsibilities include teaching, research, professional practice, or clinical service without encompassing the full scope of responsibilities expected from tenure-track faculty positions (e.g., an academic general faculty member could have primary responsibilities for research with minimal or no responsibility for classroom instruction, or have primary responsibilities for teaching and/or clinical practice without research obligations).

Academic Honorarium

A gratuitous payment of money or other things of value to a person for the person’s participation in a usual academic activity or activities for which no fee is legally required (8 CFR 214.8).

Academic Program

A degree or non-degree program leading to a credential awarded by the University.

Academic Program Agreement (APA)

Any contract or expression of intent between the University and another institution or organization to establish a joint educational program, a collaborative academic relationship, or a research activity unrelated to approved sponsored research.

Academic Services

Services for which payment is required at a pre-determined rate, that are provided by a non-employee, and that are directly related to the classroom instruction of students.

Examples of Academic Services:

Academic Consulting:
An individual serving in an advisory or consulting capacity with a University professor or employee for purposes directly relating to the instruction of students, such as research or course design. (This arrangement should be distinguished from one in which an individual performs services for a University professor or employee while the University professor or employee acts in a supervisory capacity. Such an individual should be paid as an employee, not as an independent contractor.)

Short-term Instruction:

  • Provides a course in duration of no greater than seven calendar days.
  • The course is a one-time presentation only.
  • Students will not receive University credit for attending the course/presentation.
  • The course is offered by the same provider to other agencies or institutions.

Non-Teaching Assistance:
Services such as grading papers or academic testing. Activities must relate directly to the instruction of students, and the same or similar services must be offered by the service provider to the other entities or the general public as part of a trade or business.

Translation:
Must be for the translation of material used in research or classroom instruction. Translation may be into or from a foreign language or to provide access to hearing or sight impaired students or employees.

Academic Work

Student effort that includes, but is not limited to: lectures, seminars, course assignments, laboratory sections, research, group meetings, independent study, internships, practica, studio work, recitals, and rehearsals.

Accessibility

The University objective that everyone within the University community, regardless of physical disability, will have the opportunity for appropriate access to information technology.

Accident Investigation

An investigation of an accident involving a PIT in order to determine the facts that caused or may have caused the accident and subsequent recommendations for appropriate action to prevent a similar accident from occurring.

Accounting System

The integrated modules used to process the University’s transactions that collectively serve as the University’s official system of financial record. This includes the following modules: General Ledger (GL), Grants Accounting (GA), Student Information System (SIS), Fixed Assets, Accounts Receivable (AR), and HR/Payroll.

Accounts Receivable

Monies owed to the University that have not yet been received. This can include, but is not limited to, tuition and fees, student loans, notes receivable, amounts owed for goods or services provided, grants and contracts, cash advances, library fines, parking and transportation fees, and payroll overpayments.

ACM Abatement Project

The removal of ACM by a State Licensed Asbestos Abatement Contractor with Licensed Abatement Workers and Supervisors using methods specified by a State Licensed Asbestos Abatement Project Designer.

ACM Abatement Project Monitoring

Daily inspections of asbestos abatement activities conducted by a State Licensed Abatement Project Monitor, that include confirming integrity of work site enclosures, abatement equipment, worker credentials, regulatory and specifications compliance, and taking air samples during and after abatement to ensure a healthy environment for University of Virginia faculty, staff and students and/or future occupants of the area(s) involved.

ACM Inspection

Inspection of a building or portion of a building by a State Licensed Asbestos Inspector for ACM, which includes taking samples of suspected ACM, the analysis of these samples by a State Licensed Asbestos Analytical Laboratory using PLM, and a report summarizing the types and locations of identified ACM.

ACM Management Plan

Plan developed by a State Licensed Asbestos Management Planner which describes how ACM will be properly managed in-place, while ensuring the safety of building occupants, visitors and maintenance/custodial personnel, until such materials can be properly removed.

Activity Head

The individual responsible for a University unit or department that performs a service.

Administrative and Professional (A & P) Faculty

Those positions that provide services to faculty, students and staff in order to support the institution’s primary missions of instruction, research and public service.

Administrative and Professional Non–Tenure–Track Faculty

Those positions that provide services to faculty, students and staff in order to support the institution’s primary missions of instruction, research and public service. Administrative faculty require the performance of work directly related to the management of the education and general activities of the institution, department or subdivision thereof, and are normally within three reporting steps of the president. Professional faculty require advanced learning and experience acquired by prolonged formal instruction and/or specialized work experience and are normally limited to librarians, counselors and other professional positions serving education, research, medical, student affairs and other such activities. See policy HRM-003, Employment of Non-Tenure-Track Faculty.

Administrative Dispute Resolution

The use of alternative, non-adversarial processes to address stakeholder concerns generally using a neutral third party.

Administrative Faculty

Those positions that perform work directly related to the management of the education and general activities of the institution, department or subdivision thereof, and are normally within three reporting steps of the president.

Administrative Faculty Members

Perform work directly related to the management of the educational mission and general activities of the institution, department, or subdivision thereof, and are normally within three reporting steps of the president (e.g. the dean of a school).

Administrative or Professional Faculty Members

Salaried, tenure-ineligible faculty positions whose primary responsibilities (at least 50%) are to provide services to faculty, students, and staff in order to support the institution’s primary missions of instruction, research, and public service:

Administrative or Professional General Faculty Members

General Faculty Members whose primary responsibilities (at least 50%) are to provide services to faculty, students, and staff in order to support the institution’s primary missions of instruction, research, and public service (see policy HRM-003, Employment of Administrative or Professional General Faculty Members). Effective January 3, 2017, the University no longer hires Administrative or Professional General Faculty Members. Although tenured faculty holding administrative positions are classified as “Administrative Faculty” for HR purposes for the duration of their administrative assignment, they are not hired as A/P faculty and will not retain that status once their administrative assignment ends.

Administrative General Faculty Members who perform work directly related to the management of the educational mission and general activities of the institution, department, or subdivision thereof, and whose position is normally within three reporting steps of the president (e.g. the dean of a school).

Professional General Faculty Members who perform work requiring advanced learning and experience acquired by prolonged formal instruction and/or specialized work experience, normally limited to professional positions serving education, research, medical, student affairs, and other such activities.

Administrative Position

Positions at a senior level of the University that require “the performance of work directly related to the management of the educational and general activities of the institution, department, or subdivision thereof.”1 These positions are within three or four reporting levels of the president (such as vice presidents, deans, and positions reporting to a dean or division chief, such as department chairs, associate deans, or section heads). Administrative positions as defined in this policy are discretionary appointments; all administrative service is at the will of the appointing authority.


1Consolidated Salary Authorization for Faculty Positions in Institutions of Higher Education, Commonwealth of Virginia, 2001–02.


Administrative Salary Supplement

The supplement that may be added to a faculty member’s salary during his or her service in an administrative position.

Administrative Supervisor

Supervisor (division chief, dean, vice president, or president) to whom the faculty member reports in his or her administrative capacity.

Advanced Doctoral Student

A student enrolled in a doctoral degree program who has completed all degree requirements except the dissertation.

Advancement Activities

Contacts with University Constituencies for the purpose of advancing a Constituent's level of engagement with the University or its programs.

Advertising

A logo, text, or other identifier incorporating a link to a Web site external to the University of Virginia, placed on a UVA Web page in exchange for remuneration or gifts in kind, where that placement is intended to promote or market a service, facility or product offered by the entity's Web site for a commercial purpose. Advertising includes messages containing qualitative or comparative language, price information or other indications of savings or value, an endorsement, or an inducement to purchase, sell, or use any company, service, facility or product.

Affected Person(s)

Faculty, staff or student who has been designated by his or her department to operate equipment, machinery or systems that can be affected during shutdowns for service and/or maintenance. Shutdowns are performed by Authorized Persons using Lock Out procedures. In addition, personnel may be affected by shutdowns and Lock Out procedures when they are working in controlled spaces (e.g., electrical power to work area is secured during renovation, demolition activities or abatement of hazardous materials).

Affiliated Status

Affiliated students are absent temporarily from the University for educational purposes and expect to complete their degree. Affiliated students are not enrolled, pay the affiliated status fee, and may not register for credits. Affiliated status must be approved by a student’s dean and may be used only for the purposes defined in policy PROV-011, Student Enrollment.

African American

A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Africa and who is regarded as such by the community of which this person claims to be a part.

After–the–Fact Review Method

Method used by the University to certify the distribution of salaries and wages based upon a percentage distribution to various activities, supported by the generation of periodic activity reports. These reports should reasonably reflect the employee’s activities associated with each sponsored agreement as well as to each category of other University activities. Such reports require certification.

Air Traffic Organization COA

A COA issued by the FAA’s Air Traffic Organization (ATO) permitting operation of an Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) pursuant to the University’s Exemption under circumstances not permitted by the Blanket COA.

Aircraft

Any contrivance invented, used, or designed to navigate, or fly in the air.

Allegation

Any written or oral statement or other indication of possible research misconduct made to an institutional official.

Allied Health Professionals

Optometrists, audiologists, substance abuse counselors, professional counselors, clinical social workers, nurse practitioners, physician assistants and certified registered nurse anesthetists granted clinical privileges to provide care and treatment to patients of the UVA Medical Center. 

Allowance for Doubtful Accounts

Management’s estimate of the amount of gross receivables that will become uncollectible.

Alternate Approver

An individual designated by the faculty member’s/employee’s supervisor or the supervisor’s supervisor to approve reimbursements related to cash advances, purchases, travel, etc. The selected individual is one who has the appropriate knowledge and authority to do so.

Alternates

These individuals have been designated by the Individual Authorized to Approve, as an alternate to approve on his or her behalf. The Alternate cannot approve their own travel reimbursement. 

Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR)

The use of alternative, non-adversarial processes to address stakeholder concerns generally using a neutral third party. 

Alternative Work Location

Approved work sites other than the University’s central workplace where official University business is performed. Such locations may include employees’ homes and other state agency work sites.

Alternative Work Schedule

A schedule that differs from the standard 40-hour workweek schedule particularly with regard to starting and departure time, but without altering the total number of hours worked in a workweek.  Alternative work schedules may include, but are not limited to, flextime, compressed schedules, and rotational or fixed shifts. Alternative work schedules may also be associated with job sharing and telecommuting.

Alternative Work Schedule Plan

A written work plan developed by the employee and supervisor, outlining the details of the schedule that differs from the standard hours of work.

Annual Renovation and Infrastructure Plan

A plan presented to the Board of Visitors annually through the University’s Annual Budget Summary; this provides an expedited approval process for interior renovation projects that will cost less than $5 million and will be funded from non-general fund cash.

Applications and Data Services

A division within ITC that develops and maintains applications such as the Integrated Student Information System (ISIS), University Calendars, Course Offering Directory (COD), etc.

Appointing Official

Dean, vice president, director of intercollegiate athletics programs, or executive vice president who is appointing an individual as a senior school or University administrator.

Approver

The employee who has the authority and knowledge to approve the expenditures on the account.

Archival/Historical Records

University records that document transactions or activities of the University designated by the University Archives and/or designated historical records repository, the agency’s designated records officer and the Library of Virginia as having long-term historical value in the Records Retention and Disposition Schedules. Records with historical value may include documentation of decisions, activities, and products of the University. Examples of historical records include but are not limited to: Board of Visitor meeting minutes, President’s correspondence, research final reports and accreditation records.

Area–specific Administrative Policy

Policy established under the President's or the Executive Vice President & Chief Operating Officer's authority that does not apply institution-wide, but significantly affects activities under the authority of only one vice president, equivalent University officer, or the chair of the Faculty Senate. Exception: When a policy significantly affects only activities under the joint authority of the Vice President/Dean of the School of Medicine and the Chief Executive Officer & Vice President of the Medical Center, it will be classified as an area-specific policy.

Arms–Length Letters

Letters from outside references who do not have a relationship with the candidate. Examples of such relationships would be a former PhD advisor, a collaborator or co-worker.

Asbestos–Containing Materials (ACM)

Materials that contain greater than 1% asbestos by laboratory polarized light microscopy (PLM) analysis.

Asian American

A person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, the Indian subcontinent, or the Pacific Islands, including but not limited to Japan, China, Vietnam, Samoa, Laos, Cambodia, Taiwan, Northern Mariana Islands, the Philippines, a U.S. territory of the Pacific, India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, or Sri Lanka, and who is regarded as such by the community of which this person claims to be a part.

Assistantship Wages

Funds paid to a student in exchange for instructional, administrative, or research services in a graduate assistantship; wages are not a form of stipend (see definition of “Stipend” below).

Assistantship–Related Terms

Includes:

Assistantship Wages: Funds paid to a student in exchange for instructional or research services in a graduate assistantship; wages are not a form of stipend (see the defintion of  “Stipend” below).

Full Graduate Assistantship: A full graduate assistantship is equivalent to one-half of a full-time appointment or roughly twenty hours per week.

Qualified Graduate Assistantship: A graduate assistantship that is at least half of a full assistantship (that is, a quarter-time appointment, roughly equivalent to ten hours per week) is qualified to receive tuition remission and the health insurance subsidy and is eligible for tuition adjustment.

Attestation of Compliance (AOC)

Forms a merchant, service provider, or Qualified Security Assessor (QSA) may use to attest to the results of an annual Payment Card Industry Data Security Standards self-assessment.

Authorized Approver
A University official who:
  • Has authorization over the account being charged;
  • Can only approve reimbursements within their transaction authorization limits;
  • Should be the spender’s direct supervisor;
  • Is not the individual seeking reimbursement, unless documented by the dean or vice president; and
  • Should not approve expenses for an individual to whom they report.
Authorized Cash Deficit

Cash deficits that are within the dollar and time limits authorized in writing by Treasury Management.

Authorized PersonS(s)

Faculty, staff or student who has been designated by his or her department to perform maintenance or service on a piece(s) of equipment, machinery or system and is qualified to perform the work.

Authorized Signatory

An individual authorized pursuant to the Board of Visitor’s Signatory Authority policy to sign contracts with external parties on behalf of the Rector and Visitors of the University of Virginia.

Authorizer

An individual assigned to approve travel and expense card applications, changes to card limits and restrictions, and cardholder purchases. This individual is the applicant's or cardholder's supervisor; for non-employees, this is a University department sponsor. A supervisor can designate someone else to approve on his/her behalf. The individual should not be the cardholder and, in general, should not be asked to approve for an individual to whom they report.

Authorizing Official

A manager, supervisor, department head or vice president approving the award.

Automated Clearing House (ACH)

An electronic network for financial transactions in the United States. ACH processes large volumes of credit and debit transactions in batches. ACH credit transfers include direct deposit payroll and vendor payments.

Automated Clearing House (ACH)

An electronic network for financial transactions in the United States. ACH processes large volumes of credit and debit transactions in batches. ACH credit transfers include direct deposit payroll and vendor payments.

Award Installment

An award (a seven digit alpha-numeric field in the University’s Integrated System, but not the Medical Center’s accounting system) represents a source of funds owned by a responsible unit. Spending authority is established, for a specific period of time, through an installment on the award. The type of funds is indicated by the first two characters as defined in the table below: 

Fund Source

Award Prefix

Definition

Agency

YY (Agency), YA (Agency-Direct Loans)

Funds on deposit with the University by outside agencies/organizations that are not a part of the University, but have a close relationship.

Auxiliary

SA (State Auxiliary), LA (Local Auxiliary)

Funds generated by an entity which exists to furnish goods or services to students, faculty or staff and which charges a fee that is directly related, although not necessarily equal, to the cost of the service. Examples are housing, dining, and athletics.

Endowment Income

ER (Endowment-Restricted), EU (Endowment-Unrestricted), EI (Endowment-Institutional)

Funds from the distribution on the University’s endowment.

Facilities and Administrative Cost Recov.

FA (F&A Recoveries), FI (F&A Recoveries-Institutional)

Funds derived from recovery of facility and administrative indirect costs from external research sponsors.

Gifts

DR (Gift-Restricted), DU (Gift-Unrestricted), DI (Gift-Institutional)

Funds provided from donors to the University.

Grants and Contracts

G* (Grants). The second letter of the prefix indicates the external agency funding the grant (for example, GA is used for NSF grants).

Funds derived from external sponsors who provide funds in response to a proposal for specific instruction, research, or public service activities.

Local General

LG (Local General)

Funds derived from distributions on the unrestricted endowment, earnings on short-term investments, and other (licensing, affinity card, etc.) revenues.

Sales and Service

SS (State Sales and Services), LS (Local Sales and Services)

Funds derived through other (non-auxiliary) services established to support instruction and research efforts, usually at the school or department level. Examples include self-supporting academic programs (Law and Darden), copy centers, conferences, etc.

State General

SG (State General)

Funds derived from the state general fund appropriation, tuition revenues (of non-self-supporting programs), and other activities.

State Restricted Awards

SR (State Restricted)

Funds derived from specific state general fund restricted appropriations, such as financial aid, research initiatives, and the eminent scholar match.

 

Background Check

A review of confidential and public information to confirm identity and credentials, and to investigate employment and criminal history.

Baked Goods

Foods like breads, cakes, pastries and cookies that are cooked in an oven. For the purpose of this policy, baked meats, poultry, fish and vegetable dishes are not considered “baked goods.”

Bank

The financial institutions that the University uses for commercial banking services.

Banner Ad

A typically rectangular advertisement placed on a Web site, above, below, or to the side of the site's main content area.

Basic Research

Any original investigation not having a specific commercial objective for the advancement of scientific knowledge (see IRS Rev. Proc. 2007-47). 

Bequest

Property given to the University by will, revocable living trust, or other testamentary instrument. A bequest indicates that the University is designated as a beneficiary of a will or revocable living trust, retirement plan, life insurance policy, or other revocable gift / interest. 

Billing Department

A department, division, school, or other unit that has been authorized to extend credit for the sale of goods and services, or that is responsible for the collection of accounts receivable.

Biological Agents

This includes:

  1. Microorganisms;
  2. Human and non-human primate derived materials which may contain human pathogens (e.g. blood, fluids, tissues, organs, primary and established cell lines, etc.);
  3. Biotoxins with an LD50 of less than 100 micrograms per kilogram of body weight in vertebrates; and
  4. Recombinant DNA activities as described in the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules.
Blanket COA

A COA issued in conjunction with the University’s Exemption that permits UAS Operation within certain airspace limits as set forth in the document.

Board Policy

Policy established by the Rector and Visitors of the University as provided in the Code of Virginia (Va. Code Ann. Sections 23-9.2:3) and Section 2.4 of the Manual of the Board of Visitors.

Bona Fide Business Purpose

A bona fide business purpose exists if the individual can prove a real business purpose for incurring the expense.

Bonus

A lump sum payment that is not a part of the employee’s base pay.

Business Meal

A meal that includes more than one person, has a substantive and Bona Fide Business Purpose deemed essential to the University's mission, and has departmental approval.

Note: Business meals are distinct from both daytrip and overnight "Travel Meals." Business meals may be taken while traveling, but the meal must be claimed as either "travel" or "business," not both.

Camera Monitoring

Viewing camera feeds in real-time.

Camera Oversight Group

The University group charged with the oversight of the camera requests and approvals. It shall be composed of directors/managers of The Office of the Provost, Health System Environment of Care, Information Technology Services, University Police Department and University Office of Safety and Emergency Preparedness.

Camera Recording

A recording of an analog video signal or recording a digital video stream from an IP camera.

Campus Community

Refers to faculty, staff, employees, students, patients, and visitors on or near campus; consisting of the administrative units and eleven Schools in Charlottesville, the Medical Center, and all Academic Centers.

Campus Security Authority (CSA)

Individuals at the University who, because of their function for the University, have an obligation under the Clery Act to notify the University of alleged Clery Crimes that are reported to them in good faith, or alleged Clery Crimes that they may personally witness. These individuals, by virtue of their position due to official job duties, ad hoc responsibilities, or volunteer engagements, are required by federal law to report crime when it has been observed by, or reported to them by another individual. These individuals typically fall under one of the following categories:

  1. A member of a campus police/security department.
  2. Individuals having responsibility for campus security in some capacity, who are not members of a campus police/security department (e.g., an individual who is responsible for monitoring the entrance to University property).
  3. People or offices that are not members of a campus police/security department, but where policy directs individuals to report criminal offenses to them or their office.
  4. Officials having significant responsibility for student and campus activities, including but not limited to, student housing, student discipline and campus judicial proceedings.

Official: Any person who has the authority and the duty to take action or respond to particular issues on behalf of the University.

Common examples of CSAs include (but are not limited to):

Police and Security personnel
Athletic Directors
Athletic Coaches
Faculty advisors to student organizations
Housing & Residence Life Staff
Director of Emergency Management
Medical Center Risk Management
Directors of Women’s Center
Coordinators of Fraternity & Sorority Life
Title IX Coordinators
Medical Center Employee Relations

CSA's are determined by criteria established in United States Department of Education’s The Handbook for Campus Safety and Security Reporting, pgs. 74-81 (Feb. 28, 2011).

Capital Construction Gifts

Fully expendable funds intended by a donor to finance building construction and/or renovation of capital facilities.

Capital Projects

Represented by the award prefix SP (State Plant), any acquisition of property, new construction, and improvements to property, plant or equipment costing $1 million or more. [Some SP awards are used for capitalizable expenditures less than $1 million; these are not capital projects.]

Card Administrator (Program Administrator)

A University employee registered with the Card Provider and the Virginia Department of Accounts (DOA) as the only person authorized to make changes (e.g., add or cancel cards, change card controls, etc.) to the card program.

Cardholder

An individual who holds the University Travel and Expense Card.

Cardholder Data (CHD)

Primary cardholder account number that identifies the issuer and a particular cardholder account, which can include cardholder name, expiration date and/or service code.

Career Development

A series of planned actions taken by an employee, with the active support of management, to successfully meet the demands of the current job environment, prepare for future work opportunities and challenges, and enhance employee career satisfaction.

Career Development Plan

An action plan for enhancing an employee’s level of skills, capabilities, and performance in order to excel in the current job or prepare for new responsibilities.

Cash

Currency and coins.

Cash Advance

An advance of funds to an employee solely for the purpose of paying for official purchases.

Cash Balance

Operating cash balance before commitments as reported on the Discoverer workbook “GL_Revenue Reconciliation Reports,” not to be confused with budget balance.

Cashiering

The collection, recording, safekeeping, and deposit of cash and other monetary instruments.

Catered Meal

A meal supplied by either an internal or external vendor and requires both planning and forethought on the part of the purchaser, including a pre-established menu.

Central Accounts Receivable (Central AR)

A unit within the Office of the University Comptroller that has the primary responsibility for generating invoices and dunning notices, and managing other collection efforts of accounts receivable processed through the Integrated System Accounts Receivable module (OAR), other than sponsored programs accounts receivable managed by the Office of Sponsored Programs (OSP).

Central Workplace

The University’s place of work where employees normally are located.

Centrally Managed Funds

Includes those funds sources managed by the UBO, including State General, State Restricted, Local General, State Auxiliary, Local Auxiliary, Endowment Institutional, Gift Institutional, and F&A Institutional awards.

Certificate of Authorization or Waiver (COA)

The terms “certificate of authorization” or “certificate of waiver” mean a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) grant of approval for a specific flight operation. COA is an authorization issued by the Air Traffic Organization to a public operator for a specific Unmanned Aircraft activity. After a complete application is submitted, the FAA conducts a comprehensive operational and technical review. If necessary, provisions or limitations may be imposed as part of the approval to ensure the Unmanned Aircraft can operate safely with other airspace users.

Certificate–Seeking Student

A student who is enrolled in a credit or non-credit certificate program at the University.

Certification

The process by which (i) a business is determined to be a small, women-owned, or minority-owned business or (ii) an employment services organization, for the purpose of reporting small, women-owned, and minority-owned business and employment services organization participation in state contracts and purchases pursuant to §§ 2.2-1608 and 2.2-1610.

Change Fund

A specific amount of cash kept by departments and used to make change for payments received in exchange for services rendered or goods sold by the department.

Change Fund Approver (Approver)

A full-time employee of the University who has been given authority by the department head to approve reconciliations of a Change Fund. (Approvers may not be temporary personnel, or students who are not otherwise full-time employees of the University.)

Change Fund Custodian (Custodian)

A full-time employee of the University who is responsible for safeguarding, administering, and reconciling a Change Fund. (Custodians may not be temporary personnel, or students who are not otherwise full-time employees of the University.)

Charitable Gift Annuity Contracts

Created in exchange for a gift of cash or securities. The Office of Gift Planning, through the University of Virginia Foundation, administers a gift annuity program. All gift annuity assets are invested while the annuity is active. Distribution of those assets to University-related purposes is made at the death of the survivor beneficiary. The annuitant (one or more) receives a payment stream that is guaranteed for the annuitant’s lifetime, based upon the initial value of the gift and the age of the income beneficiaries.

Charitable Remainder Trusts

Established when a donor makes a gift to a legal entity (trust) with certain conditions. Payments are made to the donor and/or other income beneficiaries in accordance with the trust terms. When the trust terminates, the remaining assets in the trust are directed to charitable uses. The “Rector and Visitors of the University” may serve as trustee of charitable remainder trusts. Charitable remainder trusts may also be created outside the auspices of the University with an independent trustee. Remainder assets from external trusts may also be designated to benefit the University (including schools or units) or related foundations.

Civil Aircraft

Any aircraft except a public aircraft.

Class 3 Laser

Has two subclasses, 3a and 3b that may be hazardous under direct and specular reflection viewing conditions, but diffuse reflection is usually not a hazard. Normally not a fire hazard. Specific controls are recommended for Class 3b lasers.

Class 4 Laser

A laser system that is a hazard to the eye or skin from the direct beam and sometimes from a diffuse reflection and can also be a fire hazard. Significant controls are required.

Classified Staff Employees

Those salaried, non-faculty employees hired prior to July 1, 2006, and subject to the Virginia Personnel Act (T. 2.2, Ch. 29, Code of Virginia, §§2.2-2900 et. seq.).

Clery Act Crimes (Clery Crimes)

Crimes required by the Clery Act to be reported annually to the University community, including: criminal homicide (murder and negligent/non-negligent manslaughter); sex offenses (rape, fondling, statutory rape, and incest); robbery; aggravated assault; burglary; motor vehicle theft; arson; hate crimes (including larceny-theft, simple assault, intimidation, or destruction/damage/vandalism of property that are motivated by bias); dating violence; domestic violence; stalking; and arrests and referrals for disciplinary action for any of the following: (a) liquor law violations, (b) drug law violations, and (c) carrying or possessing illegal weapons.

Clery Reportable Location

Property that is owned, leased, or controlled by the University which includes: (1) on campus, (2) on public property within or immediately adjacent to the campus, and (3) in or on non-campus buildings or property that the University owns, controls, or leases, is frequented by students and used in support of educational purposes.

Clinical Staff

Physicians, dentists, podiatrists, Ph.D. clinical psychologists or Ph.D. clinical pathologists granted clinical privileges to provide care and treatment to patients of the UVA Medical Center. 

Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) Camera

Any camera and associated device or process, used with or without a network, for the purpose of gathering, monitoring, recording or storing an image or images of University facilities or properties and/or people in those areas for the purpose of identification or investigation. It should be noted that CCTV cameras used for alternative purposes such as broadcasting athletic events, determining whether parking lots are full, maintaining appropriate medical bed levels, and other usages, at times, temporarily may become security cameras because of the incidents occurring within their view. Images captured by CCTV cameras may be real-time or preserved for review at a later date. [Note: Cameras used for research and patient monitoring for medical purposes are not considered CCTV cameras while being used for those purposes.]

Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) Monitoring or Recording

The process of using a closed circuit television camera to observe, review or store visual images for purposes of identifying, investigating, deterring crime and protecting safety and security.

Committed Effort
Any part of ‘University effort’ that is quantified and included in a sponsored program proposal and the subsequent award (e.g., two summer months, 12% time, one half of a year, three person-months, etc.). This quantified effort/time is associated with a specific dollar amount of the employee’s compensation. Associated effort and funding to support this devoted effort/time can be in the form of:
 
Direct Charged Effort: Any portion of ‘committed effort’ toward a sponsored activity for which the sponsor pays salary/benefits.
 
Cost Shared Effort: Any portion of ‘committed effort’ toward a sponsored activity for which the sponsor does not pay salary/benefits, which instead are paid using other, non-federal UVa sources. 
Common Carrier

A licensed commercial moving company.

Companion

An individual accompanying a University employee on University-related business and incurring travel or meals expenses reimbursable to the University employee under this policy.

Compensation Factors

This includes employee qualifications, experience, performance, market pay range, and organizational strategic & operational objectives.

Competencies

Behavioral characteristics critical for successful job performance.

Competitive Starting Pay

The base pay offered to candidates accepting a University staff position. The competitive starting pay is determined by review of several factors including relevant market-based pay range, employee skills, competencies, and other factors as appropriate to the situation. 

Complainant

The person who presents as the victim of any Prohibited Conduct, regardless of whether such person makes a report of such Prohibited Conduct.

Complaint

Allegation(s) of discrimination, harassment and/or retaliation, filed in good faith and in accordance with EOCR's Preventing and Addressing Discrimination, Harassment and Retaliation Complaint Procedures.

Component Units

A University-Related Foundation that has been determined to be significant enough under GASB guidance that it must be included in the University’s financial statements.

Conditional Offer

An offer of employment that has been approved by a designated academic hiring official as compliant with all relevant University policies and procedures but that has not yet been approved by the executive vice president and provost, the president, or the Board of Visitors.

Conditions of Participation and Assumption of Risk

A written statement provided to students and GME trainees in advance of international travel that explains the extent and limits of University responsibility, defines expectations for student and GME trainee behavior when undertaking travel for University related purposes, and articulates associated risks. As part of entering their information into the University Travel Registry, students and GME trainees are required to sign this statement to acknowledge that they understand the conditions of participation and their assumption of risk.

Confidential Employee

(1) Any University employee who is a licensed medical, clinical or mental-health professional (e.g., physicians, nurses, physicians’ assistants, psychologists, psychiatrists, professional counselors and social workers, and those performing services under their supervision), when acting in that professional role in the provision of services to a patient who is a University student (“health care providers”), and (2) any University employee providing administrative, operational and/or related support for such health care providers in the performance of such services.

Confined Space

A space that includes all of the following:

  1. is large enough and so configured that an employee can bodily enter and perform assigned work and;
  2. has limited or restricted means for entry or exit; and
  3. is not designed for continuous employee occupancy.

Confined spaces at the University include, but are not limited to: manholes, electrical vaults, boilers, wells, vessels that can be bodily entered and tanks. Generally, areas that can be entered through a door and have the same atmospheric conditions as occupied spaces, would not be classified as confined spaces.

Conflict of Interest

Real or apparent interference of one person's interests with the interests of another person, where potential bias may occur due to prior or existing personal or professional relationships.

Constituencies

Alumni, parents of alumni, parents of enrolled students, friends of the University and current or prospective donors.

Consulting

Professional activities for which faculty members receive compensation, including external consulting and internal overload.

Consulting Services

Advice or assistance of a purely advisory nature provided for a predetermined fee to an agency by an outside individual or entity. Individuals providing consulting services must always meet the criteria defining an Independent Contractor.

Contract

Any agreement between the University and one or more parties for performing, or refraining from performing, some specified act(s) in exchange for a valuable benefit known legally as “consideration.”

Contracted Independent Organizations

Contracted Independent Organizations (CIO) are formed by University students to offer educational, service and social opportunities. Membership is typically comprised primarily of students, faculty, staff, alumni, but limited community membership in the organizations is common. The University does not use the concept of "recognizing" CIOs. CIOs operate independent of the University and are not agents, servants or employees of the University. They do not have the authority to act for or commit the University to any activity, transaction or agreement. The University does not supervise, direct or control CIOs’ activities.

Contracted Services

Work to be performed under contract by an independent individual or entity where the service does not consist primarily of the acquisition of goods.

Contractor Employee

An individual who is an employee of a firm that has a formal contractual relationship with the University and has been assigned to work at the University for the duration of the contract.

Control

The application of procedures which isolate, substitute materials and processes or remove contaminants so that workers or the public are protected.

Controlled Activity

An activity involving the export of controlled technology or that due to its nature or the parties involved is otherwise subject to U.S. government export controls or sanctions requirements.

Controlled Data

Data that is a public record available to anyone in accordance with the Virginia Freedom of Information Act but is also not intentionally made public (see the definition of public data). Examples include salary information, employee name & title, meeting minutes, specific e-mail messages. (For a complete list, see The Virginia Freedom of Information Act).

Controlled Technology

For purposes of this policy, this term includes any item, component, material, software, source code, object code, or other commodity specifically identified on the Commerce Control List [Part 774 of the Export Administration Regulations (EAR)]; U.S. Munitions List [Part 121 of the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR)]; or other similar list maintained by the U.S. government. This term also includes information to the extent required in the applicable regulations.

Cooked Food

Foods that begin raw (uncooked) and are prepared by applying heat. For the purpose of this policy, any meat, poultry, fish or vegetable dish for which the ingredients begin raw and are then cooked by any method are considered cooked food.

Coordinating Team

The appropriate parties/offices (based on the specific situation) responsible for coordinating and facilitating the fitness for duty evaluation. The coordinating team typically includes individuals from University Human Resources, the Faculty and Employee Assistance Program (FEAP), the Office of the Provost, and UVA-WorkMed. If applicable, representatives from departmental human resources and the Physician Wellness Program shall be included on the team.

Copyright

A form of protection provided by the laws of the United States to “original works of authorship” including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic and certain other intellectual works, whereby copyright owners may claim, for a limited time, certain exclusive rights to specified works. This protection is available to both published and unpublished works and gives the copyright owner the exclusive right to reproduce, distribute, sell, perform, display or prepare derivatives of the work, and to protect a copyright against infringement. Copyright protection does not extend to an idea, procedure, process, slogan, principle or discovery.

Cord and Plug–connected Equipment

Equipment that is powered by an electrical energy source that can be shut down by removing the cord and plug from the energy source.

Core Time

Hours of operation during which staff may be required to be present or accessible. Core time may also include the requirement for staff to be present during a particular day of the week. Core time may be necessary in any of the alternative work scheduling arrangements.

Corporate Compliance Program

A formal program that supports the University’s commitment to following policies and standards of conduct to assist in its compliance with applicable federal, state, and other regulations.

Course Materials

Outlines, slides, Powerpoints, readings, or other content made available to students by the instructor or through UVaCollab (the centrally-supported online collaboration and learning environment at the University of Virginia) or other course reserves system.

Course of Study

One or more courses the completion of which fulfills the requirements necessary to receive an educational credential granted by a school, college or university.

Covered accounts

A consumer account or payment plan that involves multiple payments over time.

Credit Certificate Program

An academic program offered by one of the University’s schools in which all instruction is offered on a for-credit basis and which culminates in the conferral of a certificate by the University. There are three types of credit certificate programs:

Undergraduate: Curriculum is composed of undergraduate-level courses and is typically pursued by students who do not possess an undergraduate degree.

Post-Baccalaureate: Curriculum is composed of undergraduate-level courses and is pursued by students who already possess an undergraduate degree.

Graduate: Curriculum is composed of graduate-level courses and is typically pursued by students who already possess an undergraduate degree.This includes post-master’s certificates which require a master’s degree as a criterion for admission.

Crisis Management Plan for Education Abroad

University protocol that serves as the basis for crisis management readiness and response for UVA education abroad programs for program directors, administrators, faculty, and staff. Published and maintained by the International Studies Office, the Office of the Dean of Students, and the Risk Management Committee for Education Abroad.

Critical Incident Management Team (CIMT)

A group of senior University leaders who are assembled and directed by the Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer to plan for, guide, respond to, and recover from a crisis. The CIMT is the team identified in the University’s Critical Incident Management Plan (CIMP).

Cumulative Trauma Disorder (CTD)

Wear and tear on tendons, muscles and sensitive nerve tissue caused by continuous use over an extended period of time. Keyword “cumulative.” Disorder most commonly occurs in wrists and backs. Also called RSI – Repetitive Stress Injury

Data

The results of research procedures.

Day

A calendar day.

Day Trip

A trip taken for University business that does not involve an overnight stay.

Deciding Official

The UVA official who makes final determinations on allegations of research misconduct and any responsive institutional actions. Currently, this individual is the Vice President for Research and Graduate Studies.

Decision Brief

A required written summary, developed by the respective Facilities Management project manager, reviewed by the project sponsor, and approved by senior administration, which explains capital project budget increases. Required approvals include:

Executive:

Approval Required:

Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer

All decision briefs

Vice President for Management and Budget

All decision briefs

Executive Vice President and Provost

Academic-related projects

Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Debt-funded budget increases

Sr Vice President for Development & Public Relations

Gift-funded budget increases

Declared Pregnant Woman

A woman who has voluntarily informed the licensee, in writing, of her pregnancy and the estimated date of conception. The declaration remains in effect until the declared pregnant woman withdraws the declaration in writing or is no longer pregnant.

Deficit

For the purposes of this policy, a deficit is defined as a project where expenditures and outstanding commitments have exceeded the total amount budgeted.

Degree Conferral in Absentia

Students who are not taking new courses or pursuing research, but who need to be affiliated at the University for certain administrative reasons before receiving their degree, including finishing incompletes, paying an outstanding University financial obligation, or receiving official transcripts of approved transfer credit.

Degree–Seeking Student

A student enrolled in any undergraduate or graduate degree-granting program at the University. Graduate degree-seeking students include those students enrolled in one of the University’s two professional schools (Law, Medicine).

Demand Payment

Method for processing transactions when a purchase order or a requisition is not required.

Department

The Department of Small Business and Supplier Diversity or any division of the Department to which the Director has delegated or assigned duties and responsibilities.

Departmental Keys

Master Keys issued to Deans/Department Heads for the access needs of multiple users within a department subject to approval by and in accordance with the Facilities Management Lock Shop’s key control practices for secure and auditable use.

Departmental Mail

Mail/Correspondence sent out by UVa departments for delivery to addresses outside the University system.

Departments

Includes all University academic and Health System departments.

Derivative Instruments (Derivatives)

A financial instrument or contract whose value is derived from the performance of underlying market factors, such as interest rates. For purposes of the policy, they are used to manage the risk of interest rate fluctuations.

Designated Academic Hiring Official

Persons designated to extend conditional offers of employment to faculty members in the academic areas of the University on behalf of the University. The president, the executive vice president and provost, and academic deans and the University librarian are designated academic hiring officials. Hiring authority may be delegated in writing by one of these individuals with the written approval of the president or the executive vice president and provost.

Designated Approver

An individual designated by the employee’s supervisor or the supervisor’s manager to approve on his/her behalf, reimbursements related to cash advances, purchases, travel, etc. The selected individual is one who has the appropriate knowledge and authority to do so. The Designated Approver cannot approve his/her own travel reimbursement.

Designated Department Safety Coordinator

The individual designated by the department to: coordinate PIT Operator training, safe operation of PITs and Incident Reporting. This individual will work in cooperation with Environmental Health & Safety (EHS).

Designated Employee

An employee whose assigned job duties and responsibilities are considered critical to maintaining the essential operations of the University when changes in operating status occur due to an emergency event. Designated employees are first responders needed to meet the immediate needs of students, patients, research programs, or general operations.

Designated Hiring Official

An individual who is authorized to extend a conditional offer of employment to individuals on behalf of the University. The president, vice presidents, academic deans of the University’s schools, and the University librarian are designated hiring officials. Hiring authority may be delegated in writing by one of these individuals with the approval of the president or the appropriate vice president.

Designee

An individual designated by another to act on their behalf. The selected individual is one who has the appropriate knowledge and authority to approve expense reports. The designee cannot approve his/her own expense report unless they are a self-approver.

Development Plan

An annual plan jointly developed by the supervisor and employee that documents the employee’s career development goals and supporting actions for the performance period.

Differential Pay

A base pay adjustment that usually reflects specified job conditions (shift, hazards, etc) and/or makes salaries competitive with the market. Differentials may be applied to UVa Job Titles, geographic locations, or individual positions in the University.

Direct Aid

Any aid paid directly to a student, such as a stipend.

Direct Deposit

A system for electronically placing an employee's earnings in a checking or savings account at the Federal Reserve affiliated bank or financial institution of the employee's choice; also known as Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT).

Directory Information

Information contained in an education record of a student that would not generally be considered harmful or an invasion of privacy if disclosed. This information may be released by the University unless the student requests the restriction of its release.

Directory information includes the student's name; home and school address; home and school telephone number; e-mail address; UVA computing ID; date of birth; place of birth; country of citizenship; major field of study; school of enrollment; location of attendance; full-time/part-time status; level and year in school; medical residency placement; expected graduation date; participation in officially recognized activities and sports; weight and height of the members of athletic teams; dates of attendance; candidacy for degree; degrees, honors, scholarships, and awards received; the most recent previous educational agency or institution attended; the names of a student's parents or guardians; any unique identifying number created for the purpose of compiling, releasing, or transmitting directory information; and photographic images of the student.

Further, it is the practice of the University not to publish a student's Directory Information to the public and generally to restrict access to Directory Information to University-affiliated persons who have NetBadge access.

Discrimination

Inequitable treatment by the University of a person based on one or more of that person's protected characteristics or statuses, excepting any treatment permitted or required by law.

Disposition

Final destruction or transfer of records to the proper archival repository. 

Dispute Resolution Proceeding

Any structured process in which a neutral assists parties to a dispute in reaching a voluntary settlement by means of dispute resolution processes such as mediation, conciliation, facilitation, partnering, fact-finding, neutral evaluation, use of ombudsmen or any other proceeding leading to a voluntary settlement. (This does not include arbitration.)
View more information on these processes.

Divestible Quasi Endowment

A Quasi Endowment that permits divestment of principal provided (1) it has been invested in the account for at least five years and (2) divestment is made according to the plan submitted at the time the request for the endowment creation was made.

Domestic Travel

Travel within the United States.

Driver

A person who is authorized to drive University-owned vehicles on University business. 

E&G Reserves

State educational and general (“E&G”) funds, generally held at the University or vice presidential level, which are set aside for contingency or one-time initiatives. Examples include vice presidential reserves, central contingency reserves, and deferred maintenance reserves. [Note: Creation of an E&G Reserve requires the approval of the University Budget Office.]

E-cigarette

A battery-powered vaporizer that delivers nicotine to the user.

Education Abroad Program

(1) A University-sponsored academic program taught abroad, enrolling both University of Virginia and non-University of Virginia students; or (2) Education that occurs outside of the participant’s home country and results in progress towards an academic degree at a student’s home institution, including academic research.1


1Based on The Forum on Education Abroad Glossary.


Education Record

Any record that is directly related to a student and maintained by the University or a party acting for the University. Exceptions to this definition include:

  1. sole possession records or private notes held by a school official that are not accessible or released to other personnel;
  2. law enforcement or campus security records that are solely for law enforcement purposes and maintained solely by the law enforcement unit;
  3. records relating to individuals who are employed by the institution (unless the employment is contingent on their status as a student);
  4. records relating to treatment provided by a physician, psychiatrist, psychologist or other recognized professional and disclosed only to individuals providing treatment; and
  5. records of an institution that contain information about an individual obtained only after that person is no longer a student at that institution, i.e., alumni records.
Electrical Equipment

Generally, electrical equipment can be disconnected from its power source with a cord and plug at a receptacle or at a disconnect box. Equipment hardwired, such as but not limited to a breaker panel, is considered part of the facility electrical system and requires shutdown by qualified personnel.

Electronic Devices

Electronic equipment, whether owned by the University or an individual, that has a storage device or persistent memory, including, but not limited to: desktop computers, laptops, tablets, smart phones and other mobile devices, as well as servers (including shared drives), printers, copiers, routers, switches, firewall hardware, etc.

Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT)

The electronic exchange or transfer of money from one account to another, either within a single financial institution or across multiple institutions, through computer-based systems. Both ACH and Wire Transfers are considered EFTs.

Electronic Media

All media, whether owned by the University or an individual, on which electronic data can be stored, including, but not limited to: external hard drives, magnetic tapes, diskettes, CDs, DVDs, and USB storage devices (e.g., thumb drives).

Electronic System of Travel Authorization (ESTA)

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) Customs and Border Protection (CBP) online system that is used by international travelers to request entry to the U.S. through the Visa Travel Program (VTP).

Eligible employees

Faculty, professional research staff, classified salaried employees, University staff, salaried research assistants, and wage employees who have been employed by the University for: (1) at least 12 months within the last seven years; and (2) at least 1,250 hours during the 12 months before the start of the leave. (NOTE: The required 1,250 hours do not have to be worked during consecutive months. However, the 1,250 hours of work requirement applies to the 12 months immediately preceding the start of the leave.)

Emancipated Individual

A person less than 18 years of age who has been declared by a court to be independent of his or her parents.

Emergency Alerts

Notifications regarding critical incidents that pose an imminent threat to the health or safety of the University community. Examples of such emergency incidents include, but are not limited to severe weather, hazardous materials incidents, and acts of criminal violence that broadly threaten the safety of the University community.

Emergency Assistance Insurance

Insurance that provides: (1) medical evacuation,(2) security evacuation, (3) repatriation of remains, and (4) emergency assistance. The required aggregate minimum coverage is determined by the Office of Property & Liability Risk Management, the Risk Management Committee for Education Abroad, and the Office of University Counsel.

Emergency Event

Any event, natural or man-made, with the potential to cause significant injuries or deaths, shut down the University, disrupt operations, or cause physical or environmental damage. Examples include:

  • Fire
  • Hazardous Materials Incident
  • Flood
  • Severe Weather
    • Winter Weather
    • Hurricane
    • Tornado
  • Earthquake
  • Communication Systems Failure
  • Technology Systems Failure
  • Utility Failure
  • Radiological Accident
  • Civil Disturbance
  • Explosion
  • Biological or Chemical Release
  • Public Health Threat (excluding flu outbreak which is covered under State policy)
  • Acts of Violence
  • Acts of Terrorism
Emergency Notification

An announcement triggered by a significant emergency event or dangerous situation involving an immediate threat to the health or safety of the University’s faculty, staff, employees, students, patients or visitors on University Grounds. This expands upon the definition of “Timely Warning” to include both Clery Act crimes and other types of emergencies or events that pose an imminent threat to the campus community.

Emergency Notification System

A mechanism established for the purpose of and dedicated to enabling University officials to quickly contact or send messages to faculty, staff, employees and students in the event of an emergency. Examples include but are not limited to, fire alarms, sirens, UVA alerts via email/text message, local TV/Radio, etc.

Emergency Services

The preparation for and the carrying out of functions (other than functions for which military forces are primarily responsible) to prevent, minimize and repair injury and damage resulting from natural or man-made disasters, together with all other activities necessary or incidental to the preparation for and carrying out of the foregoing functions. These functions include, but are not limited to: fire-fighting services; police services; medical and health services; rescue; engineering; warning services; communications; radiological, chemical and other special weapons defense; evacuation of persons from stricken areas; emergency welfare services; emergency transportation; emergency resource management; existing or properly assigned functions of plant protection; temporary restoration of public utility services; and other functions related to civilian protection. These functions also include the administration of approved state and federal disaster recovery and assistance programs.

Employee (1)

A person appointed through University Human Resources and paid through University payroll to perform services through the University, who performs services that are subject to the will and control of the University -- both what is done and how it is done. The University's right to control, not the exercise of that right, is a key factor. The University can allow the employee considerable discretion, so long as the University has the legal right to control both the methods and results of the services.

Employee (2)

As used in this policy, includes all faculty (teaching, research, administrative and professional), professional research staff, university and classified staff employed by the University in any capacity, whether full-time or part-time, and all those employees in a wage or temporary status.

Employee (3)

The person who initiates a complaint under this policy, and who was an employee covered by this policy at the time of the event complained of.

Employee (4)

Faculty, staff, and others (including students) identified as an employee in the University’s Human Resource system. Also known as the Expense Owner.

Employment Benefits

All benefits provided by the University to salaried employees including group life insurance, health insurance, annual and sick leave, educational benefits, and retirement contributions.

Employment Services Organization

An organization that provides community-based employment services to individuals with disabilities that is an approved Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) accredited vendor of the Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services.

End User License Agreement (EULA)

A legal contract between the software licensor and purchaser which establishes the purchaser’s right to use the software. Many EULAs are digital documents where the purchasers must “accept” terms and conditions by way of a “click-through” agreement.

Endowment

A gift of money or income producing property given for a specific purpose, such as research or scholarships; it can also be unrestricted for discretionary use. Generally, the endowed asset is kept intact and only the income generated by it is spent. Endowment assets may be nonexpendable, expendable for donor-specified purposes, or unrestricted with regards to spending.

Endowment Gifts

Generally, restricted funds intended to support indefinitely a specific on-going purpose desired by a donor, such as a University program or a chair. The principal is normally not expendable on a current basis under the terms of the gift. The corpus or principal is instead invested for the long-run with generated income dedicated to supporting the stated purpose(s) of the endowment indefinitely.

Energized Electrical Work Permit

The energized electrical work permit is a written description of the electrical work to be done, signatures of qualified personnel designated by the department to take responsibility for the work, the results of the electrical hazard analysis, and documentation of all safety equipment and practices that will be used. Methods to restrict unauthorized personnel from the work area and the job debriefing are also included in the permit.

Energized Work

Working on or near exposed electric conductors or circuit parts that are or can become energized because electrical power to the working equipment or system has not been shutdown.

Energy

Purchased fuels and the energy and utilities derived from them.

Energy Conservation

Initiatives and efforts aimed at achieving a reduction in energy usage and waste.

Energy Efficiency

The use of equipment that requires less energy to operate.

Energy Isolation Device

A mechanical device that is part of a piece of equipment, machinery or system that physically prevents the transmission or release of energy. Some examples include manually operated electrical circuit breakers, disconnect switches, slide gates, line valves and blocks.

Energy Management

Activites that foster energy conservation,energy efficiency, sustainability, and environmental stewardship.

Engineering Controls

Processes that may include either (1) enclosure or confinement of a work process generating harmful air contaminants; (2) general dilution ventilation or local exhaust ventilation at the point of generation.

Equipment Trust Fund (ETF)

Funds that are provided by the Commonwealth of Virginia and managed by the State Council for Higher Education of Virginia (SCHEV) for purchasing new or upgrading obsolete equipment used for instruction and research. The threshold for ETF equipment to be capitalized is $500.

Ergonomic Issues

Points of concern regarding ability to fit the workplace to the worker's needs.

Essential University Operations

University operations that must be maintained at all times includes, but is not limited to: services basic to health care, law enforcement, safety, daily care of students, research projects including animal care, and University infrastructure (buildings and grounds, utilities, business, financial and student information systems, and electronic communications).

eVA

The Commonwealth of Virginia's electronic purchasing system.

Evaluation

Measuring and inspecting the workplace environment to describe potential exposures and make decisions regarding their seriousness.

Evaluation Panel

The panel that evaluates every report of alleged Prohibited Conduct. The Evaluation Panel may include any and all members of the University’s Threat Assessment Team and shall include, at a minimum: (1) the Title IX Coordinator, (2) a representative of the University Police Department, and (3) a representative from the Division of Student Affairs. In addition, the Evaluation Panel may include a representative from Human Resources or the Office of the Provost, depending on the circumstances of the reported incident and the status of the Complainant and the Respondent. A detailed description of the Evaluation Panel and the threat assessment process is set forth in the Student Procedures.

Event

Any incident that is not consistent with the ordinary course or expected outcomes of operations involving the use of radioactive materials or radiation producing equipment.  An injury does not have to occur.  Events include, but are not limited to:

  • A medical event or misadministration as defined by the Virginia Radiation Protection and Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations;
  • Events in which a dose is delivered to the patient that is not in accordance with the prescribed treatment plan (plan as prescribed prior to start of treatment);
  • Physical harm to patients or third parties such as visitors;
  • Equipment malfunctions that could potentially cause unexpected radiation exposures to patients or employees;
  • Unsafe radiological situations or working conditions;
  • Violations of the license or registration terms and conditions; or
  • Loss of radioactive material.
     
Excavation

Any activity where the ground is penetrated (6 inches or more) or soil is moved, removed, or compacted, including but not limited to trenching, driving, scooping, tunneling, and any hand or machine digging operations.

Executive & Senior Administrative Staff (E&SA)

University staff employees on limited term appointments having significant administrative responsibilities and duties and exercising considerable independent discretion, and having the ability to commit the University to a long term course of action. This category includes:

  • University Executive officers including Vice Presidents and the Athletic Director but excluding academic administrators (whose primary responsibility is administrative but who oversee an academic or academic-support unit of the institution) such as the Provost, Deans, University Librarian, and VP Research;
  • Members of the President’s professional staff (e.g. Chief of Staff, Chief Audit Executive; Director, Equal Opportunity Programs; etc.); and
  • Senior administrative officers with a direct reporting line to any of the above-named executives, academic administrators or Presidential professional staff, for example, Associate or Assistant Vice Presidents, Associate or Assistant Deans with administrative responsibilities, Vice Provosts with administrative responsibilities, Executive Directors, Directors, or other key senior staff; and
  • Head and Associate Head Coaches/Coordinators on individually negotiated contracts.
Executive Review Committee (ERC)

The University administrative committee which oversees the capital program. ERC membership includes the Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, the Executive Vice President and Provost, the Senior Vice President for Development and Public Affairs, the Vice President for Management and Budget, the Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, and the Architect for the University.

Exempt Employee

An employee who, based on salary and duties performed, is exempt from the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) minimum wage and overtime provisions.

Exemption

The University’s Exemption issued under Section 333 of the FAA Modernization and Reform Act of 2012, to permit the operation of a UAS as a civil aircraft under the terms and conditions set forth in the Exemption.

Expense Approver

The individual who has fiduciary responsibility and is designated as the “Approver” in the Recon@ System for a Project. The selected individual is one who has the appropriate knowledge and authority to authorize expense reports. The Expense Approver certifies that expenses are reasonable and necessary and within budget for the PTAO combination(s).

Expense Report

An expense report is either a request for reimbursement of business expenses incurred on behalf of the University or the allocation of Travel and Expense Card transactions to the appropriate University accounts.

Expert Sources and Resources

Include, but are not limited to, the U.S. Department of State Resources for Travelers, U.S. Embassies and Consulates worldwide, Overseas Security Advisory Council (OSAC), Peace Corps, Centers for Disease Control (CDC), the World Health Organization (WHO), the University’s providers of international health and emergency assistance services, foreign governments, local partners and contacts, and faculty and staff with regional expertise.

Export and “Deemed Export”

An export is the permanent or temporary shipment or transmission of controlled technology out of the U.S. The release of controlled information to a foreign national in the U.S. is deemed to be an export to the individual’s home country, also known as a “deemed export.”

Export Control Regulations (Export Controls)

Specific government imposed restrictions and limitations on the dissemination of controlled technology and other goods (e.g., tissue samples, agricultural products, plants and animals) or services to foreign persons or destinations. This includes the Export Administration Regulations (EAR); the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR); Assistance to Foreign Atomic Energy Activities regulations; and any other U.S. government regulations that similarly govern exports and are applicable to University activities.

Export Denial Lists
Extension Cord

Any detachable/portable 110-volt or higher voltage wiring that is used to transfer power from an outlet or power source to a power consuming device. Typically, an extension cord has one male plug on one end and one to three receptacles on the other end.

External Consulting

A professional activity related to an individual's area of expertise, where that individual receives compensation from a third party and is not acting as an agent of the University. The guiding principle is that, in consulting, a person agrees to use his or her professional capabilities to further the agenda of a third party in return for an immediate or prospective gain. Consulting is not considered outside employment which may or may not directly relate to an individual’s professional discipline.

Facility Electrical System

The facilities' electrical service such as breaker panels, switchgears and transformers and electrical distribution including lighting and branch wiring.

Faculty

For this policy, refers to academic (teaching and research) faculty and administrative and professional faculty.

Faculty and Employee Assistance Program (or FEAP)

University program that provides comprehensive, confidential, onsite employee assistance services (such as short term counseling, assessment, and referral services) to University employees and their families. [For more information, see FEAP website].

Faculty Senate (the Senate)

A representative body consisting of members elected from each of the schools.

Faculty Wage Employee

A faculty employee who is hired to complete a short-term and/or part-time academic work assignment, such as teaching one or more courses for one or two academic terms. Faculty wage employees are not eligible for leave or other benefits and are exempt from the Fair Labor Standards Act.

Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA)

Federal law establishing overtime pay, minimum wage and child labor requirements affecting full-time and part-time employees. Overtime pay at a rate of not less than one and one-half times the regular rate of pay is required after 40 hours of work in a workweek for those employees covered by the Act (non-exempt.)

Fall Arrest Equipment

The components of Fall Arrest Equipment include a full body harness, shock absorbing lanyard or self-retractable lifeline and locking snap hooks, all of which must meet Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) criteria. Anchor points must be approved for a static load of 5000 pounds or engineered to meet a 2:1 safety factor.

Fall Prevention

A structural design to limit a fall to the same level (e.g., guardrails, aerial lifts with work platforms).

Fall Protection System

A system designed to protect personnel from the risk of falls when working at heights of four feet or greater.

Family (1)

Includes spouse or dependent who resides in the household and moves to the new location.

Family (2)

Includes any spouse or dependent child.

Family and Medical Leave

A job-protected leave without pay (or use of an employee's accrued leave with pay) for up to 12 workweeks (or up to 26 weeks for qualified Military leave) during a Leave Plan Year for the reasons specified in this policy in conformance with the federal Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) of 1993.

Family Members

Includes spouse, partner, children, other dependent adults, and/or other relatives.

Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)

National aviation authority of the United States.  As an agency of the United States Department of Transportation, it has authority to regulate and oversee all aspects of American civil aviation.

Federal Classified Research

Research whose procedures and results are legally knowable only by individuals with United States government security clearance.

Fellowship

Unearned aid (no work or repayment requirement) awarded to graduate students, other than those in the Darden School of Business, the McIntire School of Commerce, the School of Law, or the School of Medicine (see “Scholarship”). Fellowships may consist of both direct and indirect forms of aid.

Financial Accommodation

Provision of continued financial support during a temporary absence.

Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB)

The independent organization that establishes standards of accounting and financial reporting for non-governmental entities (e.g., private industry, non-profit organizations). This includes University-Related Foundations.

Financial Conflict of Interest (FCOI)

A significant financial interest that could directly and significantly affect the design, conduct, or reporting of the investigator’s research.

Financial Institution Account
Any domestic or foreign account (checking, savings, depository, brokerage, investment, custodial, asset management, petty cash, etc.) at an institution providing financial services to the University that: 
  • Carries the name “The Rector and Visitors of the University of Virginia;” and/or
  • Uses the University’s Tax Identification Number; and/or
  • Records receipts or disbursements of University funds; and/or
  • Holds financial assets for the University; and/or
  • Processes financial transactions for the University.
Firework

Any combination of explosives and combustibles set off to generate colored lights, smoke, or noise.

Fireworks

A device consisting of a combination of explosives and combustibles, set off to generate colored lights, smoke and noise for amusement.1


1The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, Third Edition copyright © 1992 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Electronic version licensed from INSO Corporation; further reproduction and distribution restricted in accordance with the Copyright Law of the U.S. All rights reserved.


Firsthand Knowledge

Direct evidence of work performed. One may have this knowledge of work performance by either performing the work or through supervising the individual performing the work.

Fiscal Approver

The individual who has fiduciary responsibility and is designated as the “Preparer” in the Recon@ System for a Project. The selected individual is one who has the appropriate knowledge and authority to authorize expense reports. The Fiscal Approver certifies that expenses are charged to the correct PTAO combination(s), expenses adhere to University and/or Departmental policy, and required supporting documentation is attached to the expense report.

Fitness for Duty (Fit for Duty, FFD)

Possessing the physical, emotional and mental capacities to safely and effectively perform the essential functions of an employee’s job, with or without reasonable Americans with Disabilities Act accommodation, in a manner that does not present a direct threat of harm to self or others. Fitness for duty includes, but is not limited to, being free of alcohol- or drug-induced (whether or not legitimately prescribed) impairment that affects job functioning.

Fitness for Duty Evaluation (FFD Evaluation, Evaluation)

A professional assessment of an employee’s physical, emotional or mental capacities, that is carried out by an independent, licensed healthcare provider with expertise to determine if an employee is or is not capable of effectively performing his/her essential job functions without posing a threat to his/her own safety or the safety of others. 

Fixed Assets Accounting Group

The University unit under the Office of the Comptroller that is responsible for the accurate accounting and inventory of fixed assets, to include but not limited to buildings, infrastructure, equipment, software, and library books. 

FM Lock Shop

The University’s solely authorized agent for lock and key control, responsible for hardware maintenance, upgrades, and modifications, and for key creation and destruction.

Foreign National

An individual not a U.S. citizen or U.S. national (8 USC 1401 et seq).

Foreign Person

A natural person who is not a U.S. citizen, lawful permanent resident (green card holder) or protected individual (formally granted asylum or refugee status). It also means any foreign corporation, business association, partnership, trust, society or any other entity or group that is not incorporated or organized to do business in the United States, as well as international organizations, foreign governments and any agency or subdivision of foreign governments (e.g. diplomatic missions). An equivalent term used by the Department of Commerce is “foreign national”.

Forms of Financial Aid

Includes:

Direct Aid: Any aid provided directly to a student, such as a stipend.

Indirect Aid: Any aid provided on a student’s behalf to the University or another third party, including tuition, fees, and health insurance subsidies.

Fellowship/Scholarship: Unearned aid (no work or repayment requirement) awarded to students. Fellowships and scholarships may consist of direct and indirect forms of aid.

Stipend: An amount given directly to a student to support the pursuit of study or training. Students receiving a stipend are under no obligation to perform services as a condition of receiving the funds. Such support typically is provided over a period of time, e.g. ten monthly deposits of $500 each.

Tuition Remission: The in-state tuition and all required fees paid on behalf of a student serving in a qualified graduate assistantship. Tuition remission pays only the in-state portion of an out-of-state student’s tuition charges, but pays all required fees, including the comprehensive fee, the University activity fee, the school activity fee, and, where applicable, the international student fee.

Tuition Adjustment: The amount of tuition above in-state tuition paid on behalf of an out-of-state student serving in a qualified graduate assistantship. An out-of-state student who serves in a qualified graduate assistantship receives tuition remission (in-state tuition and all required fees) and may receive tuition adjustment (difference between in-state and out-of-state tuition; all required fees are covered as part of tuition remission).

Foundation

As defined for purposes of this Policy, is one which uses the University's name, consumes University resources, occupies University space, or enters into transactions with the University which require the concurrence of the University.

Foundation Employee

An individual who is an employee of one of the twenty five officially recognized affiliated foundations of the University.

Fraternal Operating Agreement Organizations (FOA Organizations)

FOA Organizations are groups comprised of University students that are governed by the Inter-Fraternity Council (IFC), Inter-Sorority Council (ISC), Multicultural Greek Council (MGC), and National Pan Hellenic Council (NPC), and which offer educational, service and social opportunities for their members. The University does not use the concept of "recognizing" FOA Organizations. FOA Organizations operate independently of the University and are not agents, servants or employees of the University. They do not have the authority to act for or commit the University to any activity, transaction or agreement. The University does not supervise, direct or control the FOA Organizations’ activities.

Fraternal Organizations (FOs)

Organizations recognized by the University through an approved agreement, which are governed by the National Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC), the Inter-Fraternity Council (IFC), the Inter-Sorority Council (ISC), or the Multicultural Greek Council (MGC).  FOs are comprised entirely of University students and offer educational, service and social opportunities to their members.

Fraudulent Transactions

Such transactions ordinarily involve a willful or deliberate action with the intent to obtain an unauthorized benefit. Fraudulent transactions can include but are not limited to:

  • Misappropriation of cash or property;
  • Falsification of time and attendance records;
  • Unauthorized use of University property or the telephone system for long distance personal calls;
  • Unauthorized use of University employees to perform non-University business;
  • Unauthorized use of faculty/staff identification cards; or
  • Any other act that represents a knowing and willful violation of University, state, or applicable federal laws, regulations, policies and/or procedures.
Friable ACM

ACM that can be crumbled, pulverized or reduced to a powder by hand pressure, and when disturbed, readily releases asbestos fibers into the air.

Full graduate assistantship

A full graduate assistantship is equivalent to one-half of a full-time appointment or roughly twenty hours per week. 

Full Shift Modification

A decision made by the President (or designee) to require only designated employees responsible for maintaining essential University operations to report to work for a specified period of time. 

Full–Time Employee

An employee who is treated as such under University standards and practices, or whose normal work schedule is 40 hours or more per week.

Full–Time Enrollment

A student who is enrolled for at least twelve (12) credits in a fall or spring term, six (6) credits in summer term, three (3) credits in January term, or a student who is enrolled in the School of Medicine and has been identified by the school as full-time (Medicine does not award credit for its courses).

Full–Time Equivalent (FTE)

A term used to quantify full-time and part-time on the basis of a full-time equivalency. FTE can be applied to employees or students.

General Academic Management Policy

Policy established under the President's authority that significantly affects activities under the authority of two or more schools.

General Administrative Policy

Policy established under the President’s or the Executive Vice President & Chief Operating Officer’s authority that significantly affects activities under the authority of two or more vice presidents or equivalent University officers, except for Area-specific Administrative Policy.

General Assets

This includes furniture, appliances, vehicles, vessels, fixtures, fittings, collections, and equipment unrelated to information technology.

General Faculty

The term “general faculty” came into use around the start of the 20th century to refer to all faculty members at the University, each of whom held tenure or were eligible for tenure in one of the University’s schools. Today, the General Faculty encompasses all academic faculty at the University and convenes once each academic year to approve the conferral of degrees in each school of the University. In the 1970’s, the University began to hire faculty members who would not be eligible for tenure. They were called “general faculty members” because they were members of the General Faculty but did not hold tenure in a school.

General Faculty Members

Tenure-ineligible salaried faculty positions that focus on teaching, research, professional practice in an academic discipline, or clinical service, or provide high-level administrative or professional services in support of the institution’s academic mission.

General Funds

General tax revenues that are appropriated by the General Assembly for the use of the institution.

General Public

The general public includes all visitors to the University who are not officially affiliated with the institution.

Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP)

Widely accepted set of rules, conventions, standards, and procedures for reporting financial information.

Gift

Pledges or outright contributions received from private sources for which no goods or services are expected, implied or forthcoming to the donor, and in which no proprietary interests are to be retained by the donor. (Refers exclusively to private gifts, even though such gifts may be termed “grants” by corporations and foundations. For more information, see FIN-001, Determining if an Award is a Gift or Sponsored Project.)

Gifts

Activities supported by a donor that are generally not considered sponsored projects and can be processed as gifts may include the following characteristics:

  • Award provides support for broadly defined activities, such as professorships, endowments, building projects, instructional programs, and unrestricted research. The donor may restrict the use of funds to a specific program area or purpose.
  • Award contains only minimal requirements, generally relating to required donor pledge payments and the University’s commitment to effectuate the donor’s intent.
  • Award requires only minimal reporting to the sponsor donor in the form of a general statement of how funds were used. The unit or faculty member involved may provide the donor with a brief summary of the results of supported activities and/or a statement that expenditures were made in accord with the intent to the gift.
  • Award is irrevocable.
Gifts or Other Special Benefits

Money, meals, loans, entertainment, advances, favors, special discounts, certificates, coupons, services, free merchandise or any other thing of value other than frequent flyer miles, hotel points, and rental car points.

Good Faith Allegation

Allegation made with the honest belief that research misconduct may have occurred. An allegation is not in good faith if it is made with reckless disregard for or willful ignorance of facts that would disprove the allegation.

Goods

Tangible property for sale, lease, or rental (i.e., merchandise, commodity, etc.).

Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB)

The independent organization that establishes standards of accounting and financial reporting for U.S. state and local governments, including public institutions of higher education.

Governmental Function

An activity undertaken by a government, such as national defense, intelligence missions, firefighting, search and rescue, law enforcement (including transport of prisoners, detainees, and illegal aliens), aeronautical research, or biological or geological resource management.

Government–Furnished Equipment (GFE)

Equipment provided by the federal government, where title remains with the federal government, and does not become University property.

Grace Period

A maximum of up to two hours past the start of the normal shift to report to work.

Graduate Assistantship

A form of graduate student employment that involves a supervised educational experience, wages, and tuition aid (see Section 6: “Qualified Assistantships and Tuition Remission” below). Graduate assistantships at the University include graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) and graduate research assistants (GRAs). (For further detail see Section 1: “Types of Assistantships” below.)

Graduate Degree–Seeking Student

A student enrolled in any graduate degree-granting program at the University, including those students enrolled in one of the University’s two professional schools (Law, Medicine). 

Graduate Medical Education (GME) Trainee

An individual who is employed by the University of Virginia Medical Center as a trainee in an Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) accredited or non-ACGME accredited post-graduate training program.

Graduate Non–Degree–Seeking Student

A student who has received permission to enroll and is registered for graduate coursework at the University but is not enrolled in one of the University’s degree-granting programs. 

Graduate Student

An individual who has either been admitted to a graduate degree program at the University (including professional degree programs) or who has received permission to enroll and is registered for coursework (including credit or non-credit) at the University during any given academic session (including fall, spring, summer, or January terms).

Graduate Teaching Assistants (GTAs)

Graduate students who have instructional assignments in classrooms or laboratories.

Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Emissions which occur during the combustion of fossil fuels such as natural gas, fuel oil, diesel, gasoline, kerosene, propane, and coal. These are typically calculated based on metric tons of equivalent carbon dioxide (MTeCO2).

Grievance

An unresolved complaint concerning the application of University policy, practice, or procedure that is communicated in writing by an employee to an appropriate University official, normally the employee’s supervisor. 

Grounds of the University

The areas where basic teaching and research facilities of the University that are used by members of the University community are located.

Group Travel Involving Students

UVA faculty-led study abroad programs and travel of groups for University-related purposes led/organized by UVA faculty, staff, or students.

Harassment

Unwelcome conduct directed against a person based on one or more of that person’s protected characteristics or statuses, which conduct is so severe or pervasive that it interferes with an individual’s employment, academic performance or participation in University programs or activities, and creates a working, learning, program or activity environment that a reasonable person would find intimidating, hostile or offensive.

Harmful Air Contaminants

Includes, but is not limited to, dusts, fibers, smoke, sprays, aerosols (including biologically-derived), gases, fumes and vapors.

Hazard Assessment Survey (HAS)

A walk-through survey of work areas for the purpose of identifying sources of hazards to faculty, staff or students. Basic categories that should be considered include, but are not limited to: impact from flying objects, moving machinery or falling objects; penetration from sharp objects that can pierce the feet or cut hands; compression (roll over of loads or heavy materials); exposure to harmful dust or chemicals; exposure to high heat or temperature extremes; exposure to light (optical) radiation from welding operations or work with lasers and electrical hazards; and exposure to noise.

Hazardous (Chemical) Waste

According to the Federal Environmental Protection Agency and the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, any waste or combination of wastes which pose a substantial, present or potential, hazard to human health or living organisms because such wastes are non degradable or persistent in nature or because they can be biologically magnified, or because they can be lethal, or because they may otherwise cause or tend to cause detrimental cumulative effects.

Hazardous (Chemical) Waste at the University of Virginia may include but is not limited to the following:

  1. Out of date chemicals.
  2. Waste from laboratory processes.
  3. Waste from maintenance processes.
  4. Waste from landscaping and turf management processes (e.g. fertilizers and pesticides).
  5. Waste from construction processes.
  6. Spent batteries, fluorescent light bulbs and ballasts.
Hazardous Equipment

Powerful equipment such as but not limited to: high speed cutting blades, drills, lathes, state of the art CNC milling machines and plasma cutters, etc., made available to University students. Note: These types of equipment may have a larger focus within this policy but should not occlude similar considerations for other types used in the learning and research laboratory (e.g., hydraulic pumps, vacuum systems and high pressure gases to list a few).

Hazardous Materials

Agents, whether solid, liquid or gas, that can harm persons or other living organisms, property or the environment.  These would include materials which are: radioactive; flammable; explosive, corrosive; toxic; or are biohazards.

Health

Freedom from physical pain or disease.

Health Insurance Subsidy

A payment made by a school or unit of the University to the University on behalf of a graduate student.

Healthcare Provider

Healthcare providers include: (1) doctors of medicine or osteopathy who are authorized to practice medicine or surgery (as appropriate) by the state in which the doctors practice; (2) any other person determined by the Secretary of the Department of Labor to be capable of providing health care services; and (3) others capable of providing health care services to include only podiatrists, dentists, clinical psychologists, optometrists, chiropractors, nurse practitioners and nurse-midwives authorized to practice in the state and performing within the scope of their practice as defined under state law. This also includes Christian Scientist practitioners listed with the First Church of Christ, Scientist in Boston, although an employee or family member may be required to submit to a medical examination for a second or third opinion (not treatment) from a non-Christian Science practitioner.

Highly Sensitive Data

Includes those data that require restrictions on access under the law or that the University decides to restrict in accord with the provisions of the Virginia Freedom of Information Act or other applicable law or regulation.

Highly Sensitive Data (1)

Highly sensitive data currently include personal information that can lead to identity theft if exposed and health information that reveals an individual’s health condition and/or history of health services use.

Highly Sensitive Data (2)

For purposes of this policy, highly sensitive data currently include personal information that can lead to identity theft if exposed and health information that reveals an individual’s health condition and/or history of health services use. While other types of sensitive data, such as student names in combination with course grades obviously exist, the negative impact of unauthorized exposure of data specifically covered by this policy (and described in detail below) is especially acute.

  1. Personal information that, if exposed, can lead to identity theft. "Personal information” means the first name or first initial and last name in combination with and linked to any one or more of the following data elements about the individual:
    1. Social security number;
    2. Driver’s license number or state identification card number issued in lieu of a driver’s license number;
    3. Passport number; or
    4. Financial account number, or credit card or debit card number.
  2. Health information that, if exposed, can reveal an individual’s health condition and/or history of health services use. “Health information,” also known as “protected health information (PHI),” includes health records combined in any way with one or more of the following data elements about the individual:
    1. Names;
    2. All geographic subdivisions smaller than a State, including street address, city, county, precinct, zip code, and their equivalent geocodes, except for the initial three digits of a zip code if, according to the current publicly available data from the Bureau of the Census the geographic unit formed by combining all zip codes with the same three initial digits contains more than 20,000 people, and the initial three digits of a zip code for all such geographic units containing 20,000 or fewer people is changed to 000;
    3. All elements of dates (except year) for dates directly related to an individual, including birth date, admission date, discharge date, date of death; and all ages over 89 and all elements of dates (including year) indicative of such age, except that such ages and elements may be aggregated into a single category of age 90 or older;
    4. Telephone numbers;
    5. Fax numbers;
    6. Electronic mail addresses;
    7. Social security numbers;
    8. Medical record numbers;
    9. Health plan beneficiary numbers;
    10. Account numbers;
    11. Certificate/license numbers;
    12. Vehicle identifiers and serial numbers, including license plate numbers;
    13. Device identifiers and serial numbers;
    14. Web Universal Resource Locators (URLs);
    15. Internet Protocol (IP) address numbers;
    16. Biometric identifiers, including finger and voice prints;
    17. Full face photographic images and any comparable images; and
    18. Any other unique identifying number, characteristic, or code that is derived from or related to information about the individual.
Hispanic American

A person having origins in any of the Spanish-speaking peoples of Mexico, South or Central America, or the Caribbean Islands or other Spanish or Portuguese cultures and who is regarded as such by the community of which this person claims to be a part.

Historically Black College or University (HCBU)

Includes any college or university established prior to 1964 whose principal mission was, and is, the education of black Americans; accredited by a nationally recognized accrediting agency or association determined by the Secretary of Education.

Honorarium

A token of appreciation paid to an individual for services performed for which payment is not required. The services involved vary, but are generally associated with oral presentations made at University sponsored functions. The arrangement between the individual and the University is informal. It does not involve a contract, and invoicing is not required. An employee may not receive an honorarium from the University.

HooView Network

A network of video display screens mounted in buildings on the University of Virginia Grounds which are connected to a central content server maintained by ITC.  Locations of screens presently connected to the HooView network include Newcomb Hall, the Aquatics and Fitness Center, Clemons Library and Thornton Hall. The HooView Network does not include display screens located at the Darden School and in University dining facilities.

Hoteling

A work arrangement where the employee works from an alternate work location at a state agency site that is closer to the residence of the employee than their University work site. The alternate work site may be any state agency work site that provides broadband internet access. 

Hyperlink or hypertext link

A logo, text, or other identifier incorporating a link to a Web site external to the University of Virginia, placed on a UVA Web page without compensation.

Identifying Information

Any name or number that may be used, alone or in conjunction with any other information, to identify a specific person.

Identity Theft

A fraud committed using the identifying information of another person.

Immediate Award

An award granted at the sole discretion of the authorizing official. Immediate awards have no impact on non-exempt employees’ overtime rate.

Incentives – Exceptional Recruitment, Retention and Project–Based

Incentives which may be applied on an exception basis in order to address significant recruitment and retention needs or for mission-critical projects. Incentive options include sign-on bonus, retention bonus, project-based incentives, compensa­tory leave, and annual leave.

Incidents with PITs

Incidents include any unsafe act performed by the operator, all near misses (i.e., passerby or operator could have been injured or property has been damaged) and all accidents involving PITs.

Independent Contractor

An entity or individual who has entered into a contractual agreement to provide goods or services to the University, and meets the following criteria:

  • Is not currently an employee of the University.
  • Has no expectation of becoming an employee at the end of contractual service.
  • Did not have an official UVA appointment within the three months prior to the commencement of the contractual service.
  • Relied or will rely upon own expertise rather than following specific instructions from the department regarding performance of the required work.
  • Performed the work to the specifications of, but not under the direction of, a University employee or student.
  • Did not have the required number of work hours and/or days of the week set by the University.
Indirect aid

Any aid awarded on a student’s behalf to the University or another third party, including tuition, fees, and health insurance subsidies. 

Indirect Cost Rate

The rate the University is authorized to charge Federal sponsors to cover indirect costs for sponsored activities. The rates are set based on location (On-Grounds/On-Campus or Off-Grounds/Off-Campus) and the type of activity (organized research, instruction, or other sponsored activity). Rates are applied as a percentage of the Modified Total Direct Costs supporting the sponsored activity. The Federal agency that sets the University’s indirect cost rates is the Department of Health and Human Services.

Indirect Costs

Those costs incurred for a common or joint purpose benefitting more than one cost objective, and not readily assignable to the cost objectives specifically benefitted, without effort disproportionate to the results achieved. The term Facilities & Administrative (F & A) costs is synonymous with indirect costs.

Individual Authorized to Approve

This individual has approval authority for local fund exceptions to state policies as well as self-approval of travel unless otherwise noted in this policy. This individual may also appoint alternate individuals who assume responsibility on his or her behalf or in his or her absence to approve certain expenditures that fall outside of University, State and Local policies.

Individual Student Travel

Includes, but is not limited to, study, research, internships, service, conferences, presentations, teaching, performances, or athletic competitions.

Individually Negotiated Contracts

An agreement between the employee and the University that sets forth employment terms and conditions. 

Individual–Use Electronic Devices

Electronic equipment, whether owned by the University or an individual, that has a storage device or persistent memory, including, but not limited to: desktop computers, laptops, tablets, smart phones and other mobile devices. For purposes of this policy, the term does not include shared purpose devices, such as servers (including shared drives), printers, copiers, routers, switches, firewall hardware, clinical workstations, medical devices (e.g., EKG machines), etc.

Individual–Use Electronic Media

All media, whether owned by the University or an individual, on which electronic data can be stored, including, but not limited to: external hard drives, magnetic tapes, diskettes, CDs, DVDs, and USB storage devices (e.g., thumb drives).

Industrial Hygiene

The science and the art of recognizing, evaluating and controlling environmental factors or stresses at the work place which may cause illness or disabilities among the workforce or community as a whole.

Information Security Incident

Any event that, regardless of accidental or malicious cause, results in:

  • disclosure of University data to someone unauthorized to access it,
  • unauthorized alteration of University data,
  • loss of data for which the University is legally or contractually bound to protect or which support critical University functions,
  • disrupted information technology service levels,
  • or otherwise is a violation of the University’s information security policies.

Examples of such incidents include but are not limited to:

  • Malicious software installations on electronic devices that store University data not routinely made available to the general public, e.g., employee evaluations, or data the University is legally or contractually bound to protect, e.g., social security numbers, credit card numbers, patient data, certain research data, etc.
  • Loss or theft of electronic devices, electronic media, or paper records that contain University data not routinely made available to the general public or data the University is legally or contractually bound to protect.
  • Defacement of a University website.
  • Unauthorized use of an individual’s computing account.
  • Use of computing resources for unethical or unlawful purposes (incidents involving pornography should be reported directly to the University Audit Department).
  • Contact from the FBI, Secret Service or other law enforcement organizations regarding a University electronic device that may have been used to commit a computer crime.

Note: To avoid inadvertent violations of state or federal law, neither individuals nor departments may release University information, electronic devices or electronic media to any outside entity, including law enforcement organizations, before making the notifications required by policy IRM-012, Information Security Incident Reporting.

Information Technology–Related Assets

Electronic equipment and devices that have previously or currently contain University data.

Initial Measurement Period (IMP)

The initial retroactive measurement or “look back” period established by the University for newly hired staff wage employees as required by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. The University’s IMP is established as 12 months from the 1st of the month following the new staff wage employee’s hire date. For example, a new wage employee hired on January 15th will have an Initial Measurement Period of February 1 to January 31.

Inquiry

Gathering information and initial fact-finding to determine whether an allegation or apparent instance of research misconduct warrants an investigation.

Institutional Base Salary (IBS)

The annual compensation rate, as determined by the University, for an employee’s appointment (‘University effort’) devoted toward University-related activities as defined above. Institutional base salary includes both compensation for University-related effort, and compensation from the University Physicians Group (UPG) for clinical effort. However, some specific types of compensation are not included for the purposes of effort reporting. These types include bonuses, reward/recognition compensation, etc.

Institutional Official

The Vice President for Research or his/her designee.

Institutional Responsibilities

An investigator’s professional responsibilities on behalf of the University which may include, for example, activities such as research, research consultation, teaching, clinical or other professional practice, institutional committee memberships, and service on panels such as Institutional Review Boards or Data and Safety Monitoring Boards.

Instructional Environments

Include, but are not limited to, classrooms, laboratories, shops and other on- and off-Grounds facilities where instructional or research activities are conducted.

Instructor

The individual listed in the University’s student information system (SIS) as the instructor for a course (or a discussion section or lab affiliated with a course), not to be confused with the tenure-ineligible title of Instructor as defined in policy PROV-029, Faculty Appointment Types and Titles.

Internal Bank

Mechanism established by the Office of Treasury Management through which treasury services are provided to the University’s units. These services include loans, investments, and cash balance management.

Internal Control
Organizational plans and procedures which are designed to:
  • Safeguard assets;
  • Verify the accuracy and reliability of accounting data and other management information;
  • Promote operational efficiency; and
  • Adhere to prescribed policies and compliance with federal and state regulations. 
Internal Overload

A University-approved agreement between a unit that is part of the University and a full-time University faculty member, under which, due to exceptional circumstances, the faculty member receives a payment, in addition to his/her salary for duties beyond those normally assigned and which occur in a time interval during which the faculty member is receiving salary from the University.

Internal Overload Compensation

Compensation for approved Internal Overload activities.

International Student

A student who enters the United States on a F-1 or J-1 visa; international students are considered out-of-state students for the purposes of calculating tuition and are subject to a special international fee.

International Travel

Travel outside the United States. For reimbursement rates, this would also include travel to Alaska, Hawaii, the Commonwealths of Puerto Rico and the Northern Mariana Islands, and possessions of the United States.

Investigation

The formal examination and evaluation of all relevant facts to determine if misconduct has occurred, and, if so, to determine the responsible person and the seriousness of the misconduct.

Investigator

The project director or principal investigator and any other person, regardless of title or position: (1) who is responsible for the design, conduct, or reporting of research or proposed research, which may include, for example, senior research staff, collaborators or consultants;and (2) whose research is supported by extramural funding (not internal funds or gifts).

IT Continuity Planning

The development of a plan for restoration of IT resources identified in the impact analysis and for interim manual processes for continuing critical departmental functions during the restoration process.

IT Impact Analysis

The identification of information, computing hardware and software, and associated personnel that require protection against unavailability, unauthorized access, modification, disclosure or other security breaches.

IT Project

A project having as its primary purpose the creation of a unique information technology product or service.

IT Risk Assessment

The determination and evaluation of threats to IT resources and the development of a plan to address any unacceptable risks.

I–9 Specialist

An employee designated by a hiring unit within a school or department who is authorized to complete the online I-9 form on behalf of the hiring department. This individual is authorized upon satisfactory completion of training provided by University Human Resources.

Job Candidate

An applicant who is being considered for a job.

Job Family

A group of job titles based on similar type of work and expertise. Job titles are grouped into Job Families based on a common focus (for example, Student Services, Trades, or Finance).

Job Sharing

In this arrangement, two employees share the responsibility for one full-time position between them. Some employees prefer to work fewer hours in exchange for part-time salary and benefits. Example: Two employees sharing a full-time job where one employee works the morning and another employee works the afternoon.

Joint Engagement

An arrangement under which an employee of the University provides services to one or more University-Related Foundations or, conversely, an employee of a University-Related Foundation provides services to the University.

Just Report It

The University’s website for online reporting (which allows for anonymous reporting) of alleged Prohibited Conduct.

Justification

The process to justify exceptions to shutting down electrical energy sources prior to doing the work. The department designee(s) must document the justification to do the work with equipment or systems still energized. Energized work on facility electrical systems including equipment permanently connected (hard-wired) to the facilities’ electrical systems will require an Energized Electrical Work Permit.

Key Control System

The University’s official database of lock and key hardware as well as authorized users.

Key Position

A position within the highest paid 10 percent of all the University's employees, working within 75 miles of the University’s facility

Laboratory Notebook

The logbook of all processes and procedures performed in the course of research which shall be kept in such a manner as to enable an investigator to reproduce the steps taken.

Law Enforcement Officer

Any sworn law-enforcement officer who has the duty and obligation to enforce the penal or traffic laws of the Commonwealth of Virginia, or any portion thereof, as certified by his appointing authority and including, but not limited to, any person appointed pursuant to §§ 4.1-100, 9.1-101, 15.2-1609, 15.2-1700, 23.1-809, 29.1-200, 30-34.2:1, 52-1, 53.1-1, 53.1-143, and 66-25.3 of the Code of Virginia; any attorney for the Commonwealth as provided in § 18.2-308 B 9 of the Code of Virginia; any conservator of the peace exempt from § 18.2-308 A of the Code of Virginia pursuant to § 18.2-308 C 4 of the Code of Virginia; and any sworn federal law-enforcement officer or agent and any law-enforcement agent of the armed forces of the United States who is authorized to carry a weapon by federal law and who is within his territorial jurisdiction or who is contracted with the university to provide services within the university's territorial jurisdiction and who is on duty or providing services to the university.

LBP Abatement Activity

The total removal of LBP or LBP hazard from a UVA residential property by a State Licensed LBP Abatement Contractor with Licensed Abatement Workers and Supervisors using methods specified by a State Licensed LBP Abatement Project Designer.

LBP Abatement Activity Monitoring

Daily inspections of lead abatement activities, which include confirming integrity of work site enclosures, abatement equipment, worker credentials, regulatory and specifications compliance, and taking air and settled dust samples during and after abatement to insure a healthy environment for UVA housing residents.

LBP Inspection

Inspection of a building, portion of a building or other painted surfaces by a State Licensed LBP Inspector/Risk Assessor, which includes taking paint chip samples of suspected LBP for analysis by an accredited laboratory, or analyzing the painted surface on-site by use of an XRF meter, and a report summarizing the lead concentrations and locations of identified LBP.

LBP Management Activity

Any activity that involves the incidental disturbance of LBP, including repair, surface preparation or repainting of surfaces that contain LBP, or the removal/disturbance of building components containing LBP. This does not require State-Licensed Contractors, Workers or Supervisors, but does require OSHA and EPA compliance.

LBP Risk Assessment

An assessment performed by a State Licensed LBP Inspector/Risk Assessor of the condition of LBP and the relative hazard potential resulting from its presence. This assessment includes a combination of visual inspection of painted surfaces, settled dust testing, soil testing and a report detailing the results and plans for proper in-place management to insure the safety of building residents, occupants, visitors and maintenance/custodial personnel, until such paints are properly removed.

Lead–Based Paints

Paints that contain greater than 0.5% lead by laboratory paint chip analysis, or greater than 1 mg per square centimeter by portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) meter analysis.

Learning in Action at UVa

A web-based content submission interface that provides the platform for content uploading, queuing, review and approval prior to the content being added to a playlist (www.atuva.net).

Leave Plan Year

Begins with the first day of the pay period which includes January 1 (known as Pay Period 1) and ends on the last day of the pay period preceding Pay Period 1 of the following year.

Leave With Partial Pay

Approved temporary reduction of a faculty member’s workload accompanied by a commensurate reduction in salary (for example, a faculty member who is approved for half-time leave retains approximately half of his/her regular responsibilities for a specified period of time, during which he/she receives 50% of his/her salary). A faculty member on leave with partial pay usually retains full-time benefits, including health insurance, although the employer’s retirement contribution during the period of leave will vary depending on the type of leave. For most types of leave with partial pay, the faculty member’s reduced salary must be sufficient to allow for deduction of the employee’s share of the health insurance premium.

Leave Without Pay

Approved absence of up to two consecutive years from the University during which a faculty member does not receive salary; availability of benefits during a leave without pay depends on the type of leave.

Leave Year

For the purposes of tracking unpaid leave taken by faculty under the federal government’s Family and Medical Leave Act, the leave year begins each year on the first day of the pay period that includes January 1. Otherwise, faculty leave periods that reset annually (i.e., annual leave) do so at the start of each fiscal year.

Lecture Notes

Verbatim or summary notes of classroom lectures in/for courses at the University of Virginia.

Licensee

The University as a recipient of a license issued under the regulations in the Virginia Administrative Code (VAC) 12 VAC5-481.

Life Income Plan or Gift

Refers to either a charitable remainder trust or charitable gift annuity.

Life Insurance

Any permanent insurance policy including whole life, universal life, variable life and variable universal life for which the University or one of its Related Foundations may be named as owner and beneficiary or simply named as beneficiary.

Limited Term Appointment

A University Executive & Senior Administrative staff position having a defined term renewable for successive terms, usually ranging from one to three years.

Limited Term Appointment

A University Executive & Senior Administrative staff position having a defined term renewable for successive terms, usually ranging from one to three years. 

Liquidity

 Cash and cash equivalents, access to cash, and the convertibility of assets to cash in order to meet operating and financial needs during the operating cycle.

Liquidity Risk

An inability to meet payment obligations in a timely manner when they become due and the risk that assets may not be convertible into cash when needed.  Liquidity risk is categorized into three risk types: 

  • Operating liquidity risk occurs when the University cannot fund its operating expenses due to insufficient liquid cash holdings.
  • Financing liquidity risk occurs as a result of external financing activities and the potential for those financings to come due before maturity (e.g., commercial paper, putable debt, credit lines).
  • Market liquidity risk occurs when the University is unable to convert assets into cash without significant losses. 
Local Funds

Restricted and unrestricted resources composed of gifts, endowments, and endowment income. Some exceptions to State and Sponsored Program limits can be processed using these funds.

Local Purchasing Card Program (Purchasing Card Program, Card Program)

A card program managed locally by the University's Purchasing Card Administrator with oversight by the University. Purchases should be made with local funds. 

Lock Out

The placement of a Lock Out Device including a padlock on the Energy Isolating Device of a piece of equipment, machinery or system. The placement is done in accordance with the department’s established procedures to ensure the energy isolation device and equipment being controlled cannot be operated until the lock out device is removed. Only the Authorized Person who placed the lock on can remove it at the completion of the job. Procedures must include those conditions when personnel other than the Authorized Person can also be affected by accidental release of hazardous energy. An example would be multiple personnel performing work activities in a controlled space (e.g., electrical power has been secured to a work area, equipment, machinery or system). During Lock Outs by multiple personnel, the equipment, machinery or system must remain secured until the last Authorized or Affected personnel has completed his or her work task and has removed his or her lock.

Lock Out Device

A device that uses a positive means such as a lock to hold an Energy Isolation Device safely and prevent the start up of a machine or equipment. Lock Out devices include valve wheel covers, ball valve locks, locks for circuit breakers, and plug and switch plate locks.

Locks

An individually keyed padlock personally assigned to an Authorized Person or Affected Person that is used with a lock out device to control and isolate energy sources.

Logo

A graphic representation or symbol of the University’s name, trademark, abbreviation, etc., often uniquely designed for ready recognition.

Long–Term Pool

An investment pool managed by UVIMCO which invests the commingled assets of the University and University-related foundations in order to maximize long-term returns commensurate with the risk tolerance of its investors.

Long–Term Volunteer

A volunteer engaged in accordance with this policy for a period longer than one week.

Major Capital Projects Program

The rolling ten year capital project plan, updated every two years and approved by the Board of Visitors.

Major Disaster

An official status declared by the President of the United States when he deems that federal assistance is needed under the Strafford Act (P.L. 93-288 as amended) to supplement state, local, and other resources to deal with the effects of a variety of natural or man-made catastrophic events.

Management Agreement

The agreement between the University and the Commonwealth required by Subsection D of §23.1-1004 of the Restructuring Act.

Management Plan

For this policy, an action plan to address a financial conflict of interest, which can include reducing or eliminating the financial conflict of interest, to ensure, to the extent possible, that the design, conduct, and reporting of research will be free from bias.

Manager

The individual employed by the University of Virginia to whom another University employee, Foundation Employee, or other non-affiliated person (e.g., visiting scholar, contractor, consultant, etc.) directly reports.

Managerial & Professional Staff Employee (M&P)

University staff employees who manage a division or subdivision of a major academic or administrative unit and/or exercise significant knowledge, discretion and independent judgment gained through advanced education or experience. This category includes coaches, other than Head or Associate Head Coaches/Coordinators, on individually negotiated contracts. M&P Staff are typically exempt employees under the provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), and therefore not subject to the FLSA provisions governing the payment of overtime.

Mandated Reporters

Those persons who, in their professional or official capacity, are required to report instances of suspected child abuse and neglect to Social Services.

Man–made Disaster

An event caused by the action of one or more persons that imperils life and property and produces danger or the imminent threat of danger through exposure to biological, chemical, or radiological hazards, as defined in Va. Code §44-146.16. Examples include large spills resulting from transportation or industrial accidents, and effects of terrorist acts. Some man-made disasters may also be called technological disasters.

Marketable Security

Any security, stock, debenture, share or other interest capable of being sold in a liquid market or readily converted to cash.

Market–Based Pay Ranges

A salary range for a UVa Job Title, based on market pay survey information from reliable primary and/or third party sources. This data reflects salary levels for similarly situated positions in the talent pool from which the University recruits its employees. Each range has a lower reference, a competitive range, and an upper reference.

Mass Electronic Mailing

Either (1) a single electronic mailing received by 1,000 or more email addresses; or (2) multiple electronic mailings of the same content received by a total of 1,000 or more email addresses.

Mass Transit Standards

A passenger transportation system in which the vehicle capacity for transporting passengers is greater than 18 passengers with a passenger count of 30 passengers per hour or more.

Master Key

By distinction of its unique “cut,” this is a key capable of unlocking multiple uniquely pinned locks, therefore performing as multiple keys.

Maximum Permissible Exposure (MPE)

The level of laser radiation to which a person may be exposed without hazardous effect or adverse biological changes in the eye or skin.

Medical Center Employees

Individuals employed by the University of Virginia Medical Center in any capacity.

Merchant

A University unit that accepts payment cards (MasterCard, Visa, Discover, and American Express) as payment for goods or services. Merchant also includes any University-affiliated party that directly or indirectly accepts funds from payment cards under the University’s Merchant Account managed by University Payment Card Services and has agreed to abide by this policy and associated procedures.

Merchant Account

A unique identification number assigned to a merchant by MasterCard/Visa/Discover and American Express which binds the Merchant to Payment Card Rules and Regulations.

Merit Increases

Base pay adjustments which vary based upon an employee’s overall performance contribution, as measured by the annual performance evaluation. If an employee’s base pay is at or above the upper reference for the pay range, the merit amount may be provided as a one-time payment, rather than as a base pay adjustment.

Messenger Mail
Mail/Correspondence sent out by UVa departments for delivery to addresses within the University system.
Micro Business

Certified small business that has no more than 25 employees and no more than $3 million in average annual revenue over the three-year period prior to their certification.

Minor Children

Children under the age of 18.

Minority Individual

An individual who is a citizen of the United States or a legal resident alien and who satisfies one or more of the following definitions:

Minority-owned Business Enterprise

A business that is at least 51 percent owned by one or more minority individuals who are U.S. citizens or legal resident aliens, or in the case of a corporation, partnership, or limited liability company or other entity, at least 51 percent of the equity ownership interest in the corporation, partnership, or limited liability company or other entity is owned by one or more minority individuals who are U.S. citizens or legal resident aliens, and both the management and daily business operations are controlled by one or more minority individuals, or any historically black college or university, regardless of the percentage ownership by minority individuals or, in the case of a corporation, partnership, or limited liability company or other entity, the equity ownership interest in the corporation, partnership, or limited liability company or other entity.

Model Aircraft

An unmanned aircraft that is: (1) capable of sustained flight in the atmosphere; (2) flown within visual line of sight of the person operating the aircraft; and (3) flown for hobby or recreational purposes.

Modified Total Direct Costs (MTDC)

All direct salaries and wages, applicable fringe benefits, materials and supplies, services, travel, and up to the first $25,000 of each subaward (regardless of the period of performance of the subawards under the award). MTDC excludes equipment, capital expenditures, charges for patient care, rental costs, tuition remission, scholarships and fellowships, participant support costs, and the portion of each subaward in excess of $25,000.

Monetary Awards
  • Those paid by any negotiable instrument (cash, check, money order and direct deposit);
  • Any item that can be readily converted to cash, such as savings bonds or refundable gift certificates; or
  • Gift cards/certificates for any amount.
Movable Capital Equipment (Capital Equipment)

Equipment that meets ALL the University’s criteria for asset capitalization:

  1. A minimum cost of $5,000 upon acquisition or completion of a fabricated asset;
  2. A useful life of greater than one year;
  3. The equipment is titled to the University;
  4. The equipment functions either as a standalone item or as an integral part of a larger University-fabricated system; and
  5. The equipment is not stationary or otherwise affixed to a building.
Moving

Actions to change a place of primary or permanent residence.

Moving Agreement

An agreement to repay moving expenses if the employee remains in the employment of the University from the first day in the new position until twelve (12) months thereafter, or as specified in the Moving Agreement. The agreement must be signed prior to an employee receiving any reimbursement.

Moving Expenses

Expenditures for transporting the employee, family, household goods and personal effects from the former residence to the new residence.

mSv/mrem

Units used to express a quantity of radiation dose.

Musculoskeletal Conditions

Circumstances that cause muscle aches and pains usually due to working in awkward positions.

National Airspace System

The National Airspace System (NAS) is the airspace, navigation facilities and airports of the United States along with their associated information, services, rules, regulations, policies, procedures, personnel, and equipment.

National Fire Protection Association 70E Standard (NFPA, NFPA 70E)

The leading consensus standard and best work practices for electrical safety. This Standard is generally revised every 3 years by professionals in the electrical industry to stay up to date with best work practices in electrical safety.

Native American

A person having origins in any of the original peoples of North America and who is regarded as such by the community of which this person claims to be a part or who is recognized by a tribal organization.

Natural Disaster

An event of nature that causes extensive and/or severe threat to or destruction of life and/or property, as defined in Va. Code § 44-146.16. Typically, such situations are the result of wind, earth­quake, blizzard, ice storm, widespread fire, or flood.

Networked Cameras that View University Assets and Public Spaces

Any camera (fixed or temporary), regardless of intended purpose, that has been determined to be in a location that can enhance public safety. This type of camera may include cameras that are integrated in an access control device (door station), emergency telephone, or installed for another purpose.

Neutral

Neutral: An individual who is trained or experienced in conducting dispute resolution proceedings and in providing dispute resolution services. This person has no stake in the dispute other than to assist the parties in reaching an agreement or resolution.

NFPA 70E)
Nominal Hazard Zone (NHZ)

The nominal hazard zone describes the space within which the level of the direct, reflected or scattered radiation during operation exceeds the applicable MPE. Exposure levels beyond the boundary of the NHZ are below the applicable MPE level.

Non-Employee

Individuals that are not paid through the University’s Human Resource system, such as contractors, students, visiting scholars, guests, and job candidates.

Non-Exempt Employee

An employee who, based on salary and duties performed, is not exempt from the minimum wage and overtime provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act and must be compensated at a rate of one and one-half times his/her regular rate of pay for hours worked in excess of 40 in a workweek.

Non-Master Key

By distinction of its unique “cut,” this is a key capable of unlocking only one specific pinned keyway.

None
Nonresident Alien

A foreign national temporarily present in the United States who is not a resident alien. Nonresident aliens are taxed according to special rules contained in certain parts of the Internal Revenue Code. A “nonresident alien” will become a “resident alien” in one of two ways: (1) by being admitted to the U.S. as, or changing status to, a Lawful Permanent Resident under the Immigration Laws (the Green Card test); or (2) by passing the Substantial Presence Test (a numerical formula which measures days of presence in the U.S.). (26 USC 7701(b).)

Non–Contract Vendor

A vendor that has not been awarded a term agreement. A purchase of $5,000 or more from a non-contract vendor requires competition. 

Non–Degree–Seeking Student

A student who has received permission to enroll and is registered for coursework at the University but is not enrolled in one of the University’s degree-granting programs.

Non–Designated Employee

An employee whose assigned job duties and responsibilities are not immediately critical to maintaining the essential services of the University when normal University operations are disrupted as a result of an emergency event. 

Non–Exempt Employee

An employee who, based on salary and duties performed, is not exempt from the minimum wage and overtime provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act and must be compensated at a rate of one and one-half times the employee's regular rate of pay for hours worked in excess of 40 in a workweek.

Non–General Funds

Resources which are earned or generated by the University such as tuition, F&A recoveries, grants and contracts, auxiliaries, or private resources.

Non–Governmental Person

Any person, firm, corporation, partnership, or entity (including the federal government and its agencies) that is not a state or local governmental unit. University-related Foundations are considered Non-Governmental Persons except where tax-exempt bonds have been issued by the University specifically for the benefit of the foundation (such bonds commonly referred to as “501(c)(3) bonds” or “qualified private activity bonds”).

Non–Immigrant Alien

An alien (foreign national) whose reason for coming to the United States involves a temporary stay that will end when its purpose has been accomplished.

Non–Monetary Awards
  • Meals, trips, plaques, trophies, desk items, cups and mugs;
  • Personal items of clothing such as caps, shirts, and sweatshirts; and
  • Other items such as tools, electronics, radios, sports equipment and time pieces.
Non–Tenure–Track Faculty

Non-tenure-track faculty positions may be grouped according to two major functional categories:

Academic: Those positions that normally involve a range of responsibilities that do not encompass the full scope expected from traditional tenure-track academic positions (e.g., an extraordinarily high obligation to research with minimal classroom instruction; or major responsibilities for teaching and/or clinical practice without research obligations).

Administrative and professional: Those positions that provide services to faculty, students and staff in order to support the institution’s primary missions of instruction, research and public service.

Administrative faculty require the performance of work directly related to the management of the education and general activities of the institution, department or subdivision thereof, and are normally within three reporting steps of the president.

Professional faculty require advanced learning and experience acquired by prolonged formal instruction and/or specialized work experience and are normally limited to librarians, counselors and other professional positions serving education, research, medical, student affairs and other such activities.

In cases where a non-tenure-track faculty member performs a mix of academic and administrative/professional duties, the academic duties must represent at least fifty (50) percent effort for the position to be classified as academic.

Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)

A regulatory agency that is part of the United States Department of Labor that enforces safety and health regulations.

Off-Grounds Rate

The University’s approved indirect cost rate for sponsored activities on which >50% of professional effort will be conducted in or on land, buildings or other space not owned by the University (state agency 207 or state agency 246) where all operation and maintenance expenses are directly incurred by the cost objective specifically benefited or are initially incurred by a Revenue Generating Activity (recharge center/service center) and then allocated to the cost objectives specifically benefitted based on an allocation plan approved by the Office of Cost Analysis. Off-Grounds locations may be privately rented/leased, government-owned, or owned by another university.

Office of Research Integrity (ORI)

The office within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) that is responsible for the research misconduct and research integrity activities of the U.S. Public Health Service.

Official Communication

Communications that include content related to a student’s enrollment, financial responsibilities, and compliance with University policies and procedures, including the Student Standards of Conduct. 

Official Purchase

All purchases of goods and/or services made with University funds which are necessary, reasonable, and directly related to the goals and mission of the University.

On-Grounds Rate

The University’s approved indirect cost rate for sponsored activities on which >50% of professional effort is conducted in or on land, buildings or other space owned by the University (state agency 207 or state agency 246) and land, buildings or other space leased by the University where the operation and maintenance expenses are incurred by non-sponsored University funding sources, e.g., state or local award types, and cannot be readily and specifically assigned to a particular project or cost objective. For the purposes of this policy, On-Grounds locations do not include leased land, buildings or other space where all operation and maintenance expenses are initially incurred by a Revenue Generating Activity (recharge center/ service center) and then allocated to the projects or cost objectives specifically benefitted based on an allocation plan approved by the Office of Cost Analysis.

Open Burning

The burning of materials wherein products of combustion are emitted directly into the ambient air without passing through a stack or chimney from an enclosed chamber. Examples include but are not limited to: campfires, bon fires, and fire pits.

Open Flame and Open Flame Devices

For the purpose of this policy, open flame and open flame devices shall include but are not limited to candles, tiki torches and oil lanterns. [Note: Users of cutting torches and welding equipment must satisfy requirements outlined under separate fire code regulations. For information on these regulations, contact the Office of Environmental Health & Safety.]

Operating Plan

A submission required by the Commonwealth of Virginia’s Department of Planning and Budget that outlines the University’s plan for expending appropriated state funds.

Operational & Administrative Staff Employee (O&A)

University Staff employees performing office, laboratory, student and library support; building construction and maintenance; equipment services; public safety; and other operational responsibilities. O&A Staff are typically non-exempt employees under the provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), and therefore are subject to the FLSA provisions governing the payment of overtime.

Other Contributing Personnel
Other individuals included in a proposal (e.g., graduate students, postdocs, trainees, technical staff, other researchers, etc.) whose service is necessary to complete the proposed scope of work, but whose intellectual involvement is not required for the success of the sponsored activity.
 
Other Monetary Instruments

Checks and money orders.

Outside Employment

Self-employment and other work for another employer in which the employee receives compensation beyond that paid by the University. Outside Employment does not include Professional Service. 

Overload Activity

That which is in excess of the normal for the individual, for which supplemental compensation is paid by the University. For purposes of time and effort reporting, such activities are excluded from effort certifications, provided that such activities are separately identified and documented in the University’s financial system. In general these activities are not related to sponsored programs and are not routine or regular in their occurrence.

Paid Leave

There are two types of paid leave available to University Staff Employees:

  1. Leave time determined at a variable rate that is based on an employee’s years of service, the use of which usually is approved in advance by the employee’s supervisor, and may be used for any purpose including but not limited to vacation, personal and family illness, attend to personal business, etc., but requiring no specific justification or explanation by the employee. This is referred to throughout the policy as Paid Leave.
  2. Leave time provided at a predetermined rate, the use of which is approved in advance by the employee’s supervisor, and must be used for the specific purpose for which it was intended (e.g., Civil and Work Related Leave, School Assistance and Volunteer Service Leave, etc.).
Parent

Biological parent or individual who stood in place of the parent of the employee and was charged with the duties and responsibilities of the parent.

Partial Shift Modification

A decision made by the President (or designee) to modify normal University operating hours for non-designated employees for a specified period of time as a result of an emergency event.

Past Due (Delinquent) Accounts Receivables

Receivables for which payment has not been received by the payment due date.

Pavilion

Ten structures on the Lawn originally used as homes for faculty and their families and as classroom space. Currently, nine provide faculty or senior administrator housing. Pavilion VII, the Colonnade Club, serves as the faculty club.

Pay Practices Program

A process for ensuring that employees’ base pay, salary increases, bonuses, incentives and other rewards (not including employer-sponsored benefits, e.g., health and dental insurance, long- and short-term disability, paid leave, retirement, life insurance, etc.) are in alignment with the University’s mission, goals, and objectives. The University staff Pay Practices Program consists of eight major components: (1) market-based pay ranges; (2) competitive starting pay; (3) merit increases; (4) promotion pay; (5) reward and recognition; (6) supplemental/differential pay; (7) incentives - exceptional recruitment, retention and project-based; and (8) strategic compensation alignment. 

Payment Card

Credit cards and debit cards linked to the cardholder’s account at a financial institution, e.g., an individual or an employer’s business account.

Payment Card Industry (PCI) Data Security Standards (DSS)

A robust security framework consisting of 12 baseline requirements for technical and operational controls pertaining to the protection of cardholder data. An annual attestation of compliance with the PCI-DSS is required for all entities involved in payment card processing.

Payment Voucher

Form used in the Integrated System for preparing demand payments.

Per Diem

A daily monetary allowance for employees to cover the cost of meals and incidentals published in the Rate Guide.

Performance Management

A management process for ensuring that employees’ work efforts, skills, and behavior are in alignment with the University’s mission, goals, and objectives. It consists of four major components: (1) performance and development planning; (2) ongoing discussions and feedback between the employee and supervisor to keep performance and development on track throughout the performance cycle; (3) evaluation of employee performance relative to performance expectations and identified capabilities and competencies; and (4) review of Career Development Plan progress.

Periodic Effort Reports
The official and approved documents used in the certification of effort devoted toward Sponsored, University and Clinical activities. Sections of the effort report are separated by types of activities included in one’s 100% ‘University Effort’ as follows:
 
Section I – Sponsored Activities (All report types): Certification requirement = recording of effort by each specific sponsored project.
 
Section II – Other University Activities (All report types) (e.g., Instruction, Administration, Non-Sponsored Research, University Service, Competitive Proposal Preparation): Certification requirement = recording of effort as a subtotal of these activities toward one’s 100% ‘University Effort’.
 
Section III – Clinical Care and Medical Center-Related Activities – Time Allotment for Medicare Cost Reporting (ONLY Clinical Faculty report type): Certification requirement = recording an average number of hours worked during a week in addition to recording specific effort devoted in: 1) Direct Patient Care; 2) Instruction for Residents/Fellows/Trainees; 3) Administration of Residency/Fellowship Programs; and 4) Medical Center-Related Clinical Administration and Management. 
Permanent Wiring

Wiring that is used for more than 8 hours in a day and is left connected at all times.

Permit–Required Confined Space (Permit Space)

A confined space that has one or more of the following characteristics:

  1. Contains or has the potential to contain a hazardous atmosphere;
  2. Contains a material that has the potential for engulfing an entrant;
  3. Has an internal configuration such that an entrant could be trapped or asphyxiated by inwardly converging walls or by a floor which slopes downward and tapers to a smaller cross-section; or
  4. Contains any other serious safety or health hazard such as, but not limited to, moving machinery or steam that must be secured for safe entry.
Perpetual Quasi Endowment

A Quasi Endowment that does not permit the divestment of principal and is intended to exist in perpetuity. Units may choose to receive distributions on the account as determined by the University’s spending policy.

Personal Property – Tangible and Intangible

Tangible property, other than real property, whose value is derived from its physical existence. Tangible personal property includes, but is not limited to, artwork, antiques, automobiles, books, technology hardware, furnishings, appliances, office and other equipment and personal items. Intangible property is property, other than real property, whose value stems from intangible elements rather than physical or tangible elements. Examples of intangible personal property include patents, copyrights, licenses and computer software.

Personal Residence

A house, condominium, townhouse or rental property (e.g., apartment, flat) where the employee's primary household is permanently maintained.

Petty Cash Approver (Approver)

A full-time employee of the University who has been given authority by the department head to approve reimbursement requisitions and reconciliations of a petty cash account. This person shall not have the authority to disburse cash. (Approvers may not be temporary personnel, or students who are not otherwise full-time employees of the University.)

Petty Cash Custodian (Custodian)

A full-time employee of the University who is responsible for disbursing, safeguarding, administering and reconciling their department’s petty cash fund. (Custodians may not be temporary personnel, or students who are not otherwise full-time employees of the University.) 

Petty Cash Fund

A limited dollar fund used to purchase goods when use of the University’s procurement system is impractical or cannot be used. Petty cash may be in the form of petty cash, traveler’s checks, money orders, or debit cards. The combination of cash and petty cash receipts must equal the authorized amount of the fund at all times.

Petty Checking Account

A draft account at a financial institution that is administered by another University department outside of Procurement and Supplier Diversity Services’ Accounts Payable Division and is used for specific disbursement needs where payment through the University’s general checking account is impractical or cannot be used. 

Petty Checking Approver (Approver)

A full-time employee of the University who has been given authority by the department head to approve reimbursements to and reconciliations of a Petty Checking Account. This person shall not have the authority to sign checks. (Petty Checking Approvers may not be temporary personnel, or students who are not otherwise full-time employees of the University.)

Petty Checking Custodian (Custodian)

A full-time employee of the University who is responsible for disbursing, safeguarding, administering and reconciling their department’s petty checking account. (Custodians may not be temporary personnel, or students who are not otherwise full-time employees of the University.) 

Petty Checking Signer (Signer)

A full-time employee of the University who has the authority to act as a signer of checks on the Petty Checking Account for disbursements. (Petty Checking Signers may not be temporary personnel, or students who are not otherwise full-time employees of the University.) 

PHS Awarding Component

The organizational unit of the Public Health service (PHS) within Health and Human Services (HHS) which funds the investigator’s research.

PHS Investigator

An investigator who proposes or conducts PHS-funded research.

PHS Regulation

The Public Health Service regulation establishing standards for institutional inquiries and investigations into allegations of research misconduct, which is set forth at 42 C.F.R. Part 50, Subpart A, entitled "Responsibility of PHS Awardee and Applicant Institutions for Dealing With and Reporting Possible Misconduct in Science."

PHS Support

PHS grants, contracts, or cooperative agreements or applications therefore.

Physical Violence

Exerting control over another person through the use of physical force, including hitting, punching, slapping, kicking, restraining, choking and brandishing or using any weapon.

Physicians Wellness Program (Physician Wellness)

A Health System program that collaborates with FEAP to identify and manage matters of individual clinician physical and mental health that is part of the peer review process and separate from clinical staff disciplinary functions. The Program aids clinicians in retaining or regaining optimal professional functioning, consistent with protection of patients and standards of appropriate and professional clinical behavior. 

Planned Award

Awards announced to employees where the employer agrees or promises to reward an employee after a specified time period for greater efficiency or productivity, better attendance, or safety, to remain in the employ of the University, or to improve the quality or accuracy of work produced. Planned awards are non-discretionary and will affect a non-exempt employee’s overtime rate under the Federal Fair Labor Standards Act.

Playlist

A collection of electronic content stored on the central server in a format to be displayed on video display screens connected to the HooView network.

PMI

Project Management Institute.

Policy

A system of principles that guide the management of the University's affairs. University leaders set policy by selecting courses of action from alternatives in a context of well-understood goals and of appropriate strategies that will be effective in pursuing those goals. They record their selections in policy statements that communicate to the University community how its members can comply with policy.

Postdoctoral Fellow

A postdoctoral appointee who, because of the source of funding (e.g., training grant, foreign government, individual fellowship, etc.), is not considered an employee of the University (see http://postdoc.virginia.edu/postdoc-resources/policies). Postdoctoral fellows are distinguished from postdoctoral research associates, who are typically funded through a sponsored research program, are employees of the University, and are included in this policy. Postdoctoral fellows are not governed by this policy.

Posthumous Degree

A degree conferred by the University to a deceased student.

Post–Issuance Debt Compliance

The activities undertaken following the issuance of tax-exempt debt in order to comply with federal guidelines. Failure to comply with federal guidelines could potentially render the interest of debt as taxable to investors.

Powered Industrial Truck (PIT)

Any mobile power-propelled (e.g., electric or fuel) truck used to carry, push, pull, lift, stack or tier materials. PITs can be ridden or controlled by a walking operator. Earth-moving and over-the-road haulage trucks are not included in this definition. Examples of PITs include: forklift trucks, narrow aisle rider trucks, straddle stackers and walking pallet trucks.

Preparer

The employee who performs the monthly detailed reconciliation and prepares documentation for approval.

Presidential Policy

Policy established under the authority of the President as defined in the Section 4.2 of the Manual of the Board of Visitors. It excludes academic policy related to the conferring of degrees, but includes academic management policy.

Pre–Packaged Goods/Food

Foods that are commercially prepared, sealed and then packaged for sale by a retail distributor.

Primary Email Address

The address to which the University sends official email notifications. These addresses are created for students within a few days of the University receiving their admission deposits. They are formatted as UVa computing ID @virginia.edu (e.g., mst3k@virginia.edu).

Primary Household

Houshold goods and personal effects which are maintained at the employee's main place of residence.

Primary Personal Residence

The home or apartment in which the faculty, staff, or professional research staff member resides most of the time. This does not include vacation or second homes, nor property owned but not occupied by the individual. Normally, this location will bear the official address as recorded by the city or county where the dwelling is located.

Principal Investigators/Project Directors and Other Key Personnel

Individuals whose effort is absolutely essential to the success of the proposed activity, either because of their critical leadership positions within the proposal (and consequently their intellectual guidance) or because of the uniqueness of the expertise they are contributing relative to the proposed scope of activity. ‘Key personnel’ typically include research scientists, principal scientists and senior scientists, depending on their intellectual contribution to the proposed scope of activity. Typically, replacement of any of these individuals requires approval from the sponsor. Importantly, the status of ‘Principal Investigator/Project Director’ and ‘key personnel’ does not necessarily imply salary support from the sponsor.

Private Business Use

Use in a Trade or Business carried on by or for the benefit of any Non-Governmental Person. Private Business Use does not include use of a facility by a member of the general public where the facility is open to the public and the user has no special legal entitlement to use of the facility.

Probationary Period

The period of initial employment (typically twelve months), that provides the employee and the University the opportunity to assess whether the employee is suited for the position.

Professional (Non–Credit) Certificate Program

A professional certification credential offered by one of the University’s schools in which all instruction is offered on a non-credit basis and which culminates in the conferral of a professional certificate by the University and recognized by a relevant professional organization.

Professional Effort

Work performed by key/senior personnel (e.g., faculty) on a specific sponsored activity.

Professional Employee

An employee whose work: (a) requires knowledge of an advanced type in a field of science or learning; (b) requires the consistent exercise of discretion and judgment; and (c) is predominantly intellectual and varied in character (based on Revenue Procedure 2005-11).
 

Professional Faculty

Those positions that require advanced learning and experience acquired by prolonged formal instruction and/or specialized work experience and are normally limited to librarians, counselors and other professional positions serving education, research, medical, student affairs and other such activities.

Professional Faculty Members

Perform work requiring advanced learning and experience acquired by prolonged formal instruction and/or specialized work experience and are normally limited to professional positions serving education, research, medical, student affairs, and other such activities.

Professional Research Staff

Professional staff principally engaged in research and appointed to limited terms of employment at the University. Positions include postdoctoral research associates, research scientists, senior scientists, and principal scientists.

Professional Service

Activities related to University or public service including service on national commissions, governmental agencies and boards, granting agency peer-group review panels, visiting committees or advisory groups to other universities, professional associations, and analogous bodies. The fundamental difference between these activities and consulting is that they are public or University service. Although an honorarium or equivalent may be received, these Professional Service activities are not undertaken for personal financial gain. Professional Service does not qualify as Consulting.

Program Staff

University faculty and staff who have an official role as agents of the University with Education Abroad Programs, including directors, instructors, assistants, Teaching Assistants (TAs), and approved volunteers.

Prohibited Conduct

All of the conduct defined as “Prohibited Conduct” in the University’s Policy on Sexual and Gender-Based Harassment and Other Forms of Interpersonal Violence (the “Title IX Policy”). Prohibited Conduct includes, as such terms are defined in the Title IX Policy, Sexual Assault, Sexual Exploitation, Intimate Partner Violence, Stalking, Sexual and Gender-Based Harassment, Complicity and Retaliation.

Project

A temporary endeavor undertaken to create a unique product, service or result (PMBOK, 2000 edition).

Project Management

The application of knowledge, skills, tools and techniques to mitigate risk, control budget and manage scope of tasks.

Project Manager

University of Virginia representative who may be the Facilities Management Project Manager, Maintenance Superintendent, Cost Center Manager, or other person who either oversees, plans, supervises or arranges for a maintenance, construction, renovations or demolition project within University of Virginia facilities.

Promotion Pay

A base pay adjustment reflecting an employee’s advancement in applied skills and/or responsibilities. Salary adjustment decisions are made using a holistic approach where multiple relevant factors (including the market-based pay range, employee skills and competencies, and performance) are considered in support of sound pay decision-making.

Protected Characteristics/Statuses

Age, color, disability, gender identity, marital status, national or ethnic origin, political affiliation, race, religion, sex (including pregnancy), sexual orientation, veteran status, and family medical or genetic information.

PTAEO

The five-segment account structure to which expenses are charged that allows for enhanced reporting. [P = Project, T = Task, A = Award, E = Expense, O = Organization.] 

Public Aircraft

An aircraft owned and operated by the United States Government, government of a State, the District of Columbia, or a territory or possession of the United States or a political subdivision of one of these governments in furtherance of a governmental function, and that is not used for commercial purposes.

Public COA

A COA issued by the FAA permitting a UAS to be operated as a public aircraft in furtherance of a governmental function.

Public Data

Data intentionally made public and are therefore classified as not sensitive. Any data that are published and broadly available are, of course, included in this classification. University policy holds that the volume of data classified as not sensitive should be as large as possible because widespread availability of such information will enable others to make creative contributions in pursuit of the University's mission. Examples of digitally published data (a subset of not sensitive data) are listed in Appendix A - Definitions & Examples of Data Classification.

Purchase Order (PO)

A commercial document issued by the University to a vendor, indicating types, quantities, terms and agreed prices for products or services that the vendor will provide to the University.

Purchase Requisition

The procedural method by which University departments may request the purchase of Goods and/or Services that require processing by Procurement and Supplier Diversity Services (PSDS). Purchase requisitions are generally used for situations including, but not limited to: high dollar value purchases; vendor documents requiring University signature; or restricted goods and/or services where a purchase order is not automatically created by the University department.

Purchaser

An individual authorized to obtain goods and services on behalf of the University. Limitations on this authority for individual employees are addressed in FIN-030, Purchases of Goods and Services.

Pyrotechnics

1. The art of manufacturing or setting off fireworks. 2. A fireworks display.2


2The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright © 2002 by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.


Qualified Employee

The employee is authorized by the University through documented Confined Space training to recognize hazards and perform work activities in confined spaces.

Qualified Exigency Leave

Military leave which may be used for such pressing or urgent situations as:

  • short-notice deployment (defined as notice of an impending call or order to active duty within seven days of the date of deployment);
  • military events and related activities, such as informational briefings, family assistance programs, or official ceremonies and events;
  • childcare and school activities, including arranging alternative childcare, caring for children on an immediate, urgent basis, and attending school meetings;
  • making financial and legal arrangements, such as executing powers of attorney, obtaining military identification cards, or preparing a will or trust;
  • counseling;
  • rest and recuperation (that is, to spend time with a military family member who is on short term rest and recuperation leave);
  • post-deployment activities, including arrival ceremonies, reintegration events, and issues relating to the death of a military family member; and
  • other events arising out of a family member's service that may qualify, as long as the employer and employee agree that it qualifies, and agree on the timing and length of leave to be taken.
Qualified Graduate Assistantship

A graduate assistantship that is at least half of a full assistantship (that is, a quarter-time appointment, roughly equivalent to ten hours per week) is qualified to receive tuition remission and the health insurance subsidy and is eligible for tuition adjustment.

Qualified Health Insurance Subsidy (Qualified Subsidy)

A mandated subsidy funded centrally by the University and provided on behalf of a graduate student who meets the qualifications defined in this policy.

Qualified Personnel

Qualified personnel must be knowledgeable of the electrical equipment or systems that they work on, the inherent electrical hazards and how to avoid them. OSHA 1910 Subpart S-Electrical and NFPA 70E (8) hour training, including refresher training, is required for personnel assigned to facility maintenance and service responsibilities related to electrical equipment and facility electrical systems. Training shall include electrical safety work practices and the protective measures necessary to avoid shock and burn injury hazards.

Qualified Scholarship

Any amount received by an individual who is a candidate for a degree at an educational organization used to pay for tuition and any fees, books, supplies, or equipment required for courses of instruction at such educational organization. (IRC 117.) Payments deemed "qualified scholarships" are not includable in the gross income of the recipient, are not subject to withholding, and are not reportable by the educational institution.

Qualified Security Assessor (QSA)

An individual who has been certified by the Payment Card Industry Security Standards Council to validate a merchant’s or service provider’s adherence to the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standards.

Qualified Sponsorship

A logo, text, or other identifier incorporating a link to a Web site external to the University of Virginia, placed on a UVA Web page to acknowledge donation of services, products, or financial or research support to the University of Virginia or an office, unit, center, department, or division of the University of Virginia. The IRS defines sponsorship as "a payment for which there is no expectation that the sponsor will receive a 'substantial return benefit,' the income received by the sponsored organization is not subject to tax as unrelated business income."

Quasi Endowment

Funds established to function like an endowment but which may be expended at the discretion of the entity’s governing board. The principal is typically preserved while expenditures to support the purpose may be made from Quasi Endowment distributions. Distributions are determined in accordance with the entity’s spending policy.

Radiation Worker

An individual engaged in activities licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission or the State of Virginia and controlled by a licensee. The individual’s assigned duties involve exposure to radiation or to radioactive material from licensed and unlicensed sources of radiation.

Rate Guide

Federal rates used for per diem published by the U.S. Government which includes maximum lodging, meals, and incidental rates based on location of travel. The Rate Guide is established by the General Services Administration for destinations in the contiguous U.S. (CONUS) and by the Department of Defense for non-CONUS destinations.

Real Estate Loan

Funds advanced by the University to the University of Virginia Foundation to acquire strategic real estate assets that serve the financial and programmatic needs of the University.

Real Property

Real estate, including residential, commercial, industrial and undeveloped land.

Real Property Asset

Land and any improvements to the land such as buildings or parking lots.

Receipt

Documentation that shows vendor name, address, items purchased, cost, and date.

Receiving

The process of documenting the receipt of all goods and services by signing and dating a packing slip or receipt.

Receiving Unit

A unit of the University which proposes to accept the transfer of a real property asset and ongoing responsibility for such real property asset from a responsible property management unit.

Recognition

Requires extensive knowledge of potential workplace exposures to hazardous materials, chemicals or agents.

Recognition Leave

Additional day(s) of leave provided that may be used for personal purposes.

Recon@UVa System

A system that provides an electronic solution for the documentation of reconciliations for all organizational units at the University of Virginia (including all academic schools and departments).

Reconciliation

A systematic review of accounts against source documents to verify that all charges are accurate and appropriate, and to identify expected charges that have not yet occurred. 

Record System

A way of storing, disseminating, or organizing records either electronically or in paper form.

Recording

A video or audio replication or photographic image recorded on devices including, but not limited to, audio recorders, video recorders, cellular phones, digital cameras, MP3 players, computers and other handheld devices that record images and/or sound.

Records

Any document, file, computer program, database, image, recording, or other means of expressing information in either electronic or non-electronic form.

Records Officer

An appointed official designated by the state agency who is responsible for providing standards, procedures, training and guidance to meet requirements for the proper management of University records. Appointments of agency records officers must be filed with the Library of Virginia per state code § 42.1-85 C.

Records Retention and Disposition Schedule

A listing of records series, approved by the Library of Virginia, that provides retention and disposition instructions for University records

Recovery

Amounts collected on accounts that were previously written off the accounting records of the University.

Recyclable, Recoverable, or Reusable Materials

Materials that can be diverted from disposal in a landfill and accepted by the University’s Recycling program.

Red Flag
Suspicious information or activities that suggests the possibility of identity thieves using someone else’s identifying information at the University to commit fraud. Red flags fall into several categories including but not limited to: 
  • Suspicious documents such as altered or forged identification cards;
  • Suspicious personal identifying information such as fictitious addresses or telephone numbers; and
  • Suspicious activity related to accounts such as mail that is repeatedly sent and returned as undeliverable.
Regular Semester

Fall or spring academic terms. All references to “semester” in this policy refer to a regular semester.

Regulated Medical Waste

Any waste materials that are capable of producing a disease by an organism likely to be pathogenic to healthy humans, such as the following:

  1. Discarded cultures and stocks of microorganisms, specimens, vaccines and associated items containing organisms likely to be pathogenic to healthy humans.
  2. Human blood and certain body fluids as defined by OSHA. 
  3. Items saturated or caked with human blood or body fluids that would release blood/body fluid in a liquid or semi liquid state if compressed or would flake if handled.
  4. Human tissue or anatomical wastes.
  5. Sharps (needles, syringes with attached needles, and scalpel blades: Needles, syringes with attached needles, scalpels, scissors lancets, guide wires and glass pasture pipettes, etc.).
  6. Animal carcasses, body parts, bedding and related wastes when intentionally infected with organisms likely to be pathogenic to healthy humans.
  7. Any residue that results from the clean up of a spill of infectious waste.
  8. Any waste contaminated by or mixed with infectious waste.
Release Time

Time during the regular work day which an employee is released from normal work duties. 

Relocation

The process of assigning, establishing and/or settling in a particular place for employment purposes.

Relocation Expenses

Expenditures other than moving expenses incurred in the process of relocating the employee and family.

rem (Sv)

Units used to quantify radiation dose.

Remote Deposit

The process of using a desktop scanner that creates images of checks that can be deposited to a bank account without physically depositing at a bank branch or UVA Cashier’s Offices.

Remote Pilot Certificate with a Small UAS Rating

A Certificate issued under the Code of Federal Regulations (14 C.F.R. Part 107) to permit a person to operate a UAS weighing under 55 pounds as a civil aircraft.

Remote Pilot in Command

The Remote Pilot in Command is directly responsible for and is the final authority as to the operation of the small unmanned aircraft system.

Report on Compliance (ROC)

A survey tool used annually by eligible merchants and service providers to evaluate their compliance with the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standards.

Reporter

Any University of Virginia student who is registered or enrolled for credit- or non-credit-bearing coursework who discloses an incident of alleged Prohibited Conduct to a University employee. Reporters include students who disclose such information, whether as Complainants, Respondents, or witnesses.

Request for Confidentiality

A Reporter’s request that information disclosed about an incident of alleged Prohibited Conduct be maintained confidentially, that no investigation occur, and/or that no disciplinary action be taken.

Research

A systematic investigation, study or experiment designed to develop or contribute to generalizable knowledge. The term encompasses basic and applied research. The term includes but is not limited to any such activity for which research funding is available from a PHS Awarding Component through a grant or cooperative agreement, whether authorized under the PHS Act (42 USC Chapter 6A) or other statutory authority, such as a research grant, career development award, center grant, individual fellowship award, infrastructure award, institutional training grant, program project, or research resources award.

Research Credits

Credits that have been classified as research-only for tuition purposes (see PROV-015, Criteria for Establishing Research-Only Courses).

Research Enrollment

A student who is enrolled for graduate research credits only. Research graduate students may be degree-seeking or non-degree-seeking.

Research Integrity Officer (RIO)

UVA official responsible for assessing allegations of research misconduct and determining when such allegations warrant inquiries and for overseeing inquiries and investigations. The RIO, Dave Hudson, is appointed by the Vice President for Research and Graduate Studies.

Research Misconduct or Misconduct in Research

Fabrication, falsification, plagiarism, or other practices that seriously deviate from those that are commonly accepted within the research community for proposing, conducting, or reporting research. It does not include honest error or honest differences in interpretations or judgments of data.

Research Record

Any data, document, computer file, computer diskette, or any other written or non-written account or object that reasonably may be expected to provide evidence or information regarding the proposed, conducted, or reported research that constitutes the subject of an allegation of research misconduct. A research record includes, but is not limited to, grant or contract applications, whether funded or unfunded; grant or contract progress and other reports; laboratory notebooks; notes; correspondence; videos; photographs; X-ray film; slides; biological materials; computer files and printouts; manuscripts and publications; equipment use logs; laboratory procurement records; animal facility records; human and animal subject protocols; consent forms; medical charts; and patient research files.

Researcher

Any person who may be engaged in University research.

Resident Alien

A foreign national temporarily or permanently present in the U.S. Resident aliens are taxed in the same manner as U.S. citizens on their worldwide income. (26 USC 7701(b).)

Respondent

The person against whom an allegation of research misconduct is directed or the person whose actions are the subject of the inquiry or investigation. There can be more than one respondent in any inquiry or investigation.

Respondent (1)

Any person who has been accused of Prohibited Conduct.

Responsible Administrator

The faculty member or administrator responsible for a decision affecting a graduate student’s assistantship, including a supervising faculty member, director of graduate studies, department chair, or dean.

Responsible Employee

For purposes of students disclosing alleged acts of Prohibited Conduct, any University employee who is not a Confidential Employee is a Responsible Employee. For purposes of employees disclosing alleged acts of Prohibited Conduct involving University employees, supervisors, management, and human resource professionals are Responsible Employees. (See footnote 1, below.) Responsible Employees include Resident Assistants, Graduate Teaching Assistants, and all other student-employees, when disclosures are made to any of them in their capacities as employees.

Responsible Officer

The position or role in each division that is responsible for oversight and administration of this policy. The Assistant Vice President for Financial Planning and Analysis, the Director of Finance/Controller, and the Vice Chancellor for Finance Administration/Chief Operating Officer are the responsible officers for the Academic Division, Medical Center, and the College at Wise, respectively.

Responsible Person

For purposes of time and effort certifications, an individual having firsthand knowledge or using a suitable means of verification of the work performed toward specific sponsored activities. Normally, this is the employee or Principal Investigator for whom the University effort report has been generated. In the event that the employee/Principal Investigator is unable to certify the effort report, a surrogate who having firsthand knowledge or using a suitable means of verification of the work performed may certify the report (e.g., the Department Chair, a Co-Investigator).

Responsible Person

The individual who is authorized to receive a key and to whom the key was originally issued.

Responsible Property Management Unit

A unit of the University with financial and operating responsibility for a real property asset. Units with this responsibility are:

  • Facilities Management, for Educational and General real property (except Darden and Law)
  • Darden School of Business
  • School of Law
  • Auxiliaries (Athletics, Business Operations, Student Affairs, etc.)
  • Medical Center
  • College at Wise
Restricted Position
A University Staff position that is:
  1. created to complete a specific function or project within a defined period of time, and has a required system end date established at the time of hire or as subsequently extended; or
  2. funded wholly or in part from non-continuous or non-recurring funding sources (e.g., grants, donations, contracts, etc.) and contingent on the continued availability of funding, the cessation of which for any reason results in the abolition of the position.
Restriction Lists

These are the U.S. government lists of individuals and other entities who are denied U.S. export privileges or who are subject to additional licensing requirements. Examples include the Denied Parties List, Entity List, Specially Designated Nationals List, Debarred List, and the Unverified List.

Restructuring Act

The Restructured Higher Education Financial and Administrative Operations Act, Chapter 10 of Title 23.1 of the Code of Virginia.

Retaliation

Reprisal, interference, restraint, penalty, discrimination, intimidation or harassment, determined in accordance with applicable legal standards.

Retaliation (1)

Any action that adversely affects the employment or other institutional status of an individual that is taken by an institution or an employee because the individual has in good faith, made an allegation of research misconduct or of inadequate institutional response thereto or has cooperated in good faith with an investigation of such allegation.

Retention

The length of time records should be kept in a certain location for administrative, legal, fiscal, historical or other purposes.

Revenue Generating Activities (RGAs)

All operations that produce income or recover costs on a recurring basis by providing goods or services to the University community or, in some cases, to the general public.

Revenue Parent

A combination of Revenue Projects that has a project number beginning with the characters “RP” in the integrated system.

Revenue Project

Projects used for only non-sponsored programs to record revenue in the General Ledger. 

Reward and Recognition

Bonuses, non-monetary awards, and recognition leave provided to employees in recognition of an employee's contributions to the overall objectives of the University. These rewards are typically provided to employees in recognition of teamwork, special project completion, identification/implementation of new or modified business practices, exemplary effort, employee appreciation and skill acquisition.

Risk Management

The total process to identify, control and manage the impact of potential harmful events, commensurate with the value of the protected assets. Risk management includes impact analysis, risk assessment, and continuity planning.

Risk Management Committee for Education Abroad

Members include the vice provost for global affairs and representatives from the Office of University Counsel, Office of Property & Liability Risk Management, Office of the Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, International Studies Office, Elson Student Health Center, Office of the Dean of Students, Office of the Vice President for Research, and at least three members of the faculty from schools with a particularly high level of student travel abroad programs, who each serve three-year terms.

Sabbatical Leave

A periodic program of academic leave awarded on a competitive basis. 

Safe Harbor

A provision that shields a party from liability under the law provided that certain conditions are met. IRS revenue procedures contain several Safe Harbors relating to activities which could generate Private Business Use, the most important of which pertain to management contracts and research contracts.

Safety

Conditon of being safe from undergoing or causing hurt, injury or loss (Webster's Dictionary).

Sanction Regulations (Sanctions)

Includes all of the embargoes and trade sanction regulations administered by the Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC), U.S. Department of the Treasury. Sanctions programs are typically country-based (e.g., those imposed against the governments of Iran, Cuba, and North Korea) or list-based (e.g., Counter Terrorism and Counter Narcotics).

Scheduled Workweek

An employee’s scheduled workweek includes the hours of the day and the days of the week the employee is regularly scheduled to work.

Scholarship

For tax purposes, an amount given to aid in the pursuit of study or training for which there is no obligation to perform services by the recipient as a condition of receiving the funds. "Scholarships," "Fellowships," or "Stipends" have interchangeable meaning in this policy. Any payments paid to or on behalf of foreign nationals requiring the performance of services past, present, or future, in exchange for the payments, are taxable wages subject to withholding regulations.

Scholarship (1)

The federal government defines a scholarship as an amount given in aid in the pursuit of study or training for which there is no obligation to perform services by the recipient as a condition of receiving the funds. While some university policies use “scholarship,” “fellowship,” and “stipend” interchangeably this policy distinguishes between the terms. At the University, scholarships area warded to undergraduate students in all schools and graduate students in the Darden School of Business, the McIntire School of Commerce, the School of Law and the School of Medicine. Scholarships may consist of direct or indirect forms of aid and are often named (e.g. The Thomas Jefferson Scholarship).

School–specific Academic Management Policy

Policy established under the President’s authority, typically delegated through the Executive Vice President and Provost to the dean of the individual school, that involves the activities of only one school. The dean obtains approval for such policy from the Executive Vice President and Provost.

Security

An instrument which allows the holder to claim an ownership position or interest in a corporation; a creditor relationship or interest in a corporation, a government or its agency; or other rights to ownership or interest as stipulated in specific contracts.

Security Administrator

Employee with the responsibility of granting electronic funds transfer entitlements within a banking system to users of that system.

See and Avoid

The duty of the Remote Pilot in Command to exercise vigilance to avoid interference with other aircraft and obstacles that would affect the safe operation of the aircraft.

Segregation of Duties

The process of safeguarding assets by assigning the authorizing, recording, and reconciling of transactions to different individuals.  This practice assists in detecting errors, deterring improper activities, and mitigating collusion opportunities.

Self-Assessment Questionnaire (SAQ)

A survey tool used annually by eligible merchants and service providers to evaluate their compliance with the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standards.

Self–Approver

An individual who does not need supervisor’s approval before incurring expenses and has authority to self-approve his/her own expenses. Only the University president, members of the president’s executive cabinet, the Chief Executive Officer of the Medical Center, the Chancellor at Wise, the Executive Director of the Miller Center, and deans may self-authorize or approve his/her own expenses.

Self–Balancing Electric Wheeled Board (Hoverboard)

A type of portable, rechargeable personal mobility device that uses gyroscopic technology to allow an operator to balance on a small-wheeled platform. These devices are commonly referred to as “Hoverboards,” but may also be referred to as Swagways, IO Hawks, and Skywalkers.

Senior Administrators

Positions that report to a dean, vice president, director of intercollegiate athletics, or executive vice president (including, but not limited to, department chairs, associate deans, associate vice presidents, division chiefs, or vice provosts) that have significant responsibility for overseeing one or more functions of a school or unit.

Serious Health Condition/Illness

A period of incapacity of more than three consecutive days that involves: (1) Treatment 2 or more times; or (2) Treatment by a Health Care Professional (HCP) on at least one occasion which results in continuing treatment. The first visit must occur within 7 days. The second visit must occur within 30 days, unless there are extenuating circumstances. If the condition is “chronic”, there must be at least 2 visits to the HCP per year in connection with the chronic medical condition.

Service

An activity in which labor is the major factor and not merely incidental to the production, acquisition, and/or delivery of a good.

Service Provider

An entity, other than a card brand, that is directly involved in the processing, storage, or transmission of cardholder data on behalf of another entity. This includes entities that provide services that could impact the security of cardholder data.

Servicing or Maintenance Activities

Workplace activities that include but are not limited to: installing, setting up, inspecting or maintaining equipment; and lubrication, cleaning and making tool changes where the employee may be exposed to the unexpected energization of the equipment or release of hazardous energy.

Sexual Misconduct

A broad term that encompasses non-consensual sexual contact (including non-consensual sexual intercourse), sexual harassment, sexual exploitation, dating or domestic violence (also known as relationship violence), and stalking.

Short–Term Project

Work assignments not to exceed an average of 29 hours per week or 1500 hours in an annual Standard Measurement Period.

Short–Term Volunteer

A volunteer engaged in accordance with this policy for a period not longer than one week.

Shutdown

The action of cutting off electrical power to electrical facility systems or equipment and securing the electrical energy from accidental startup until the work has been completed.

Signatory Authority

The legal authority to bind the University (including any school, department or business unit thereof) in a contract.

Significant Financial Interest

For this policy:

  1. A financial interest consisting of one or more of the following interests of the investigator and those of the investigator’s immediate family (spouse, dependent children), that reasonably appears to be related to: (a) the investigator’s institutional responsibilities if the research will be PHS-funded, or (b) the study sponsor or an entity that would have an interest in the work and/or the outcome of the research project if the research will not be PHS-funded.
    1. With regard to any publicly traded entity, a significant financial interest exists if the value of any remuneration received from the entity in the twelve months preceding the disclosure combined with the value of any equity interest held in the entity as of the date of disclosure, when aggregated, exceeds $5,000. For purposes of this definition, remuneration includes salary and any payment for services not otherwise identified as salary (e.g., consulting fees, honoraria, paid authorship); equity interest includes any stock, stock option, or other ownership interest, as determined through reference to public prices or other reasonable measures of fair market value;
    2. With regard to any non-publicly traded entity, a significant financial interest exists if the value of any remuneration received from the entity in the twelve months preceding the disclosure, when aggregated, exceeds $5,000, or when the investigator or his immediate family member holds any equity interest (e.g., stock, stock option, or other ownership interest);
    3. Intellectual property rights and interests (e.g., patents, copyrights), upon receipt of income related to such rights and interests.
       
  2. The term significant financial interest also includes any reimbursed or sponsored travel related to their institutional responsibilities, including travel paid on behalf of the investigator and not reimbursed to the investigator (so that the exact monetary value may not be readily available); except for travel reimbursed or sponsored by a federal, state, or local government agency, an institution of higher education, an academic teaching hospital, a medical center, or a research institute affiliated with an institution of higher education. The disclosure will include the purpose of the trip, the identity of the sponsor/organizer, the destination and the duration. The Institutional Official or designee will determine if further information is needed, including monetary value, in order to determine whether the travel constitutes a financial conflict of interest with sponsored research.
     
  3. The term significant financial interest does not include the following types of financial interests: salary, royalties, or other remuneration paid by or on behalf of the University to the investigator, including intellectual property rights assigned to the University and agreements to share in royalties related to such rights; income from investment vehicles, such as mutual funds and retirement accounts, as long as the investigator does not directly control the investment decisions made in these vehicles; and, income from seminars, lectures, or teaching engagements sponsored by, or income from service on advisory committees or review panels for a federal, state, or local government agency, an institution of higher education, an academic teaching hospital, a medical center, or a research institute affiliated with an institution of higher education.
Significant University Resources

The use of University resources is “significant” when it entails substantial and dedicated use of University equipment, facilities, or personnel. The use of a computer in a faculty office, incidental supplies and occasional use of University personnel or shared facilities would typically not be considered significant use. In contrast, utilization of University laboratories or special instrumentation, dedicated assistance by University employees, special financial assistance or extensive use of shared facilities would constitute significant use.

Site and Itinerary Review

Review for alignment with the University’s health, safety, and security standards that may lead to requirements for further planning, limits on, or, in some cases, deferral or cancellation of travel.

Six Year Capital Outlay Plan

The capital outlay plan required by the Department of Planning and Budget. This is a subset of the Major Capital Projects Program.

Six Year Financial Plan

The financial plan required by Chapters 933 and 943 of the 2006 Acts of Assembly, updated every two years and approved by the Board of Visitors.

Small Business Enterprise

A business that is at least 51 percent independently owned and controlled by one or more individuals who are U.S. citizens or legal resident aliens and, together with affiliates, has 250 or fewer employees or average annual gross receipts of $10 million or less averaged over the previous three years. One or more of the individual owners shall control both the management and daily business operations of the small business.

Small Unmanned Aircraft

An Unmanned Aircraft weighing less than 55 pounds.

Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP)

A travel registry administered by the U.S. Department of State that automatically distributes country-specific information, Travel Alerts and Warnings, fact sheets, and emergency messages to registrants. STEP also helps the Department of State better assist travelers in the event of an emergency.

Smoking

The carrying or holding of any lighted pipe, cigar or cigarette of any kind or any lighted smoking equipment or the lighting, inhaling or exhaling of smoke from a pipe, cigar or cigarette of any kind.

Social Event Meal

A meal served at an event that may be primarily social in nature and not necessarily essential to the mission of the University. However, the event must still support the mission of the University in some way, such as team building events or holiday celebrations for employees. The event may not be to honor or recognize particular individuals (e.g., wedding showers or baby showers are not allowable social event meals).

Solicitation

Selling, promoting for the purpose of sales, commercial advertising, canvassing, and/or fundraising.

Solid Waste

Materials which are typically disposed in a landfill. This does not include hazardous, bio-hazardous, or other regulated waste.

Source Reduction

Programs that target the elimination of waste at its source and prior to its entering the waste stream. Examples include working with manufacturers and suppliers to use less packaging, ordering materials and supplies in bulk, and matching newspaper and phone book production to circulation.

Special Program Participant

An individual who is enrolled in a special program sponsored by a University department.

Special Status Organizations

Special status student organizations act as agents of the University in carrying out a University function(s) through authority delegated by an authorized University official. The manner in which the function(s) is conducted is subject to the supervision and control of the University. The special status student organization is solely responsible for activities conducted by the organization that have not been officially delegated to it by the University. When conducting non-University authorized activities, the student organization is considered by the University to be non-special status and, therefore, not acting as an agent of the University.

Specialized Skills or Training

Specific, definable skills or training that enables an individual to provide certain identified emergency services requested by public officials during a disaster. These skills and training may or may not be related to the qualifications used in the individual’s University job.

Specialty Vehicle

A vehicle designed to transport 10 or more passengers.

Spending Authority

The permission to make expenditures from a particular fund source for a specific period of time up to an established level, provided with the setting of an award installment. 

Splitting

Separating transactions in order to circumvent established procurement and expenditure guidelines. 

Sponsor Salary Caps–National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Salary caps are limitations, sponsor-imposed ceilings, on the amount of an individual’s salary that a sponsor will directly support. When an employee’s institutional base salary (IBS) exceeds the effective salary cap the University must fund the difference from non-federal sources. This difference is considered cost share (this cost share is solely for purposes related to the Indirect/Facilities and Administrative – F&A- cost rate calculations and is not to be counted/claimed/reported toward mandatory or voluntary cost share commitments) to that sponsored activity. The associated effort is expected to be captured on the effort report for certification purposes (toward 100% ‘University effort’). Annual salary caps can be found at the NIH or OSP website.

Sponsored Activities

Externally funded programs under which the University is obligated to perform a defined scope of work according to specific terms and conditions and within budgetary limitations. These programs are to be budgeted and accounted for separately from other activities. Sponsored activities include grants, contracts, cooperative agreements, clinical trial agreements, Intergovernmental Personnel Agreements and other awarding instruments supporting research, instruction, public service, and clinical trials. These activities are established as ‘G or Z’ awards in the University’s Integrated Financial System.

Sponsored Programs

Programs funded by revenue derived from grants and contracts. Most of the state limits apply to payments and reimbursements made from these sources. Exceptions are noted in the text of this policy or may be included in the terms of the grant or contract in question.

Sponsored Project

Any externally funded research, public service or scholarly activity that has a defined scope of work and set of objectives which provide a basis for accountability and sponsor expectations. If any one of the following characteristics applies to a project, including commitments made in the proposal or required in the award agreement, it must be processed through the Office of Sponsored Programs:

  • Sponsor is the federal, state, or local government OR an agency that has been established simply as a flow-through of federal, state, or local government funds for accounting purposes.
  • Proposal or award requires a signature from an authorized official binding the University to the terms and conditions of the proposed project.
  • Sponsor has written policies requiring indirect cost recoveries. Note: the absence of a policy does not preclude the award from being a sponsored program.
  • Award contains provisions regarding ownership of intellectual properties, i.e., patents and copyrights.
  • Sponsor requires the delivery of specific goods or services by the University (e.g., technical assistance or training).
  • Award requires a detailed technical report.
  • Award payments are contingent upon programmatic or fiscal reporting (e.g., milestones, invoices).
  • Award includes budget restrictions (e.g., prior approval for re-budgeting and restrictions on certain budget categories, equipment or fringe benefits).
  • Award includes a provision for audit.
  • Award restricts or monitors publications or use of results.
  • Award requires protection of sponsor and/or confidential information.
  • Project involves the use of human subjects, vertebrate animals, radioisotopes on humans, radioactive materials, recombinant DNA, human body substances, etiologic agents or proprietary materials.
Sponsored Projects

Projects funded by revenue derived from grants and contracts. Restrictions and limits set by the University for other sources of funds apply.

Sponsor–Owned Equipment
Capital equipment purchased by grants awarded to the University, for which title is retained by the Sponsor.
 
Sponsor–Provided Resources

Funds and facilities provided by governmental, commercial, industrial or other private organizations which are administered and controlled by the University shall be considered University resources.

Spouse

Husband or wife as recognized under the laws of the Commonwealth for the purpose of marriage.

Staff Employees

Classified employees who are:

Employment Category:
Salaried or Wage

Payment Type:
Restricted (positions with limited funding where funding has an expiration/stop date) or Unrestricted

Full Time Equivalency:
Full-time or Part-time

Exemption Status:
Exempt: Not subject to (i.e., they are exempt from) the federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) minimum wage and overtime provisions. Employees are typically paid on a salaried basis; or
Non-Exempt: Subject to the minimum wage and overtime pay provisions of the federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).

Staff Wage Employee

A staff employee who is hired to perform a short-term work assignment and is ineligible for leave or other benefits, with the exception of pre- and post-tax savings plans, and the Wage Health Plan when requisite criteria are met. These employees are not covered by the Virginia Personnel Act and may be compensated in one of two ways:

  1. Hourly: The terms and conditions of employment stipulate an hourly rate of pay rather than a fixed salary and paid on an hourly basis for actual hours worked. Positions paid on an hourly basis are, in most cases, non-exempt.

  2. Goal-pay: The terms and conditions of employment stipulate a set rate for the performance of FLSA-exempt, short-term, goal/deliverable based assignments where payment is a certain reoccurring dollar amount. The payment for staff goal assignments must be greater than the equivalent FLSA salary exemption threshold.
Standard Measurement Period (SMP)

The retroactive measurement or “look back” period established by the University as October 3 to October 2 as required by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

Standard Workweek

The University standard workweek (for payroll purposes) begins at 12:01 a.m. Monday and ends at 12:00 midnight the following Sunday.

State Agency

Any authority, board, department, instrumentality, institution, agency, or other unit of state government. "State agency" does not include any county, city, or town.

State Funds

Restricted and unrestricted resources generated from tuition and fee revenues, Facilities and Administrative (F&A) cost recoveries, state tax dollars, sales and services activities, grants and contracts, and auxiliary activities.

State of Emergency

The status declared by the Governor of Virginia (see Va. Code §44-146.17) or of another state for conditions of sufficient severity and magnitude that assistance is needed to supplement the efforts of localities and other relief organizations.

State Purchasing Card Program

A card program managed locally by the University's Purchasing Card Administrator with oversight from DOA. Purchases may be made with local or state funds. 

Status

A student may be enrolled or affiliated.

Enrolled students pay tuition and fees and may register for credits. An enrolled student may be enrolled full-time, three-quarter time, half-time, or less than half-time.

Affiliated students are absent temporarily from the University for educational purposes and expect to complete their degree. Affiliated students are not enrolled, pay the affiliated status fee, and may not register for credits. Affiliated status must be approved by a student’s dean and may be used only for the purposes defined in this policy.

Stipend

An amount given directly to a student as part of a fellowship or scholarship to support the pursuit of study or training. Students receiving a stipend are under no obligation to perform services as a condition of receiving the funds. Such payments typically are provided over a period of time, e.g. ten monthly payments of $500 each.

Strategic Compensation Alignment

A base pay adjustment provided to retain employees critical to the work of the University. Salary adjustment decisions are made using a holistic approach where multiple relevant factors (including the market-based pay range, employee skills and competencies, competitive counter-offers, and performance) are considered in support of sound pay decision-making.

Student

An individual who either has been admitted to a degree or certificate program at the University or has received permission to enroll and is registered for coursework (including credit or non-credit) at the University during any given academic session (including fall or spring semesters, Summer Session, or January Term). 

Student (1)

A person enrolled in one or more courses at the University of Virginia.

Student Financial Services (SFS)

The University department with the responsibility for billing, management, collection and reporting of student receivables. SFS is also responsible to act as the University’s agent for receivables assigned to collection agencies or credit reporting bureaus.

Student Organization

A general term that refers to all Contracted Independent Organizations (CIOs), Fraternal Operating Agreement Organizations (FOAs), and Special Status and Agency groups.

Student Procedures

The University’s Procedures for Reports Against Students, setting forth the procedures for investigating and resolving reports of alleged Prohibited Conduct committed by Students.

Student Resource Guide

The University’s Resource and Reporting Guide for Students, providing complete information for students about how to locate and access University and community resources for medical and mental-health assistance and support, how to obtain interim remedial and protective measures, how to report Prohibited Conduct to the University and to law enforcement, and other information that may be useful to University students who have experienced or witnessed an incident of Prohibited Conduct.

Suitable Means of Verification

The process through which one receives assurance that work was performed so as to provide a certification of effort on the periodic effort reports. This process must take into consideration other university records and provide for the documented review of such records in support of work performed. Some examples of these records might include: calendars, teaching schedules, logbooks, or sponsor budgets. Other means of verification may also suffice, including e-mails attesting to effort devoted based upon firsthand knowledge. Oral verification from the employee/Principal Investigator or others fulfilling the role of a responsible person to an administrator will not suffice as a suitable means of verification.

Supervisor

As used throughout this Policy, “supervisor” refers to any person who has authority to undertake or recommend tangible employment decisions affecting an employee or academic decisions affecting a student; or to direct an employee’s work activities or a student’s academic activities. Examples include faculty members to whom work-study students report and team lead workers who, from time to time, monitor other employees’ performance or direct their work.

Supervisor (1)

A University employee charged with responsibility for managing another employee’s performance, including conducting performance evaluations.

Supplemental Approver

The individual designated as the Employee’s Supervisor in the University’s Human Resource System and certifies exceptions to policy are reasonable, necessary, and support the mission of the University.

Supplemental Pay

Payments that apply to specific positions designed to address unique needs of the University (i.e., shift differential). Supplements are not included as part of the employee’s base pay.

Surplus Property

All University General and Information Technology-Related Assets (including Federally-owned) that are moveable from one location to another, including abandoned property, that is unwanted, worn-out, obsolete, excess to the University’s needs, or otherwise unsuitable for intended use.

Sustainability
The ability to meet the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. ¹

¹From the United Nations World Commission on Environment and Development (WCED), now known as the Brundtland Commission.
Tag Out

Posting a prominent warning tag with durable string onto the energy isolation device and/or lock out device of the piece of equipment, machinery or system being controlled. This tag documents the Authorized Person taking the equipment out of operation and the date. It is a warning to others that the equipment cannot be put back into operation until the tag and lock have been removed by the Authorized Person.

Tangible Personal Property

Property, other than real property, which may be seen, weighed, measured, felt, or touched, or is in any other manner perceptible to the senses. The term "tangible personal property" shall not include stocks, bonds, notes, insurance or other obligations or securities (as defined in VA Code § 58.1-602).

Tangible Personal Property (1)

Items belonging to residents that can be photographed and where evidence of damage to the property is visibly apparent.

Tax Identification Number

The number used to identify the University of Virginia for Federal and State tax matters. The Tax Identification Number may also be referred to as the Employer Identification Number (EIN) or Federal Employer Identification Number (FEIN). 

Tax–Exempt Debt (Bonds) Issued by the University

Debt issued and managed (1) by the University; or (2) by a State authority at the request of the University and for which the University pays its pro-rata share of the debt service.

Tax–Exempt Debt Compliance (TEDC) Information Dashboard

A data repository and reporting tool developed in-house for Tax Exempt Debt Compliance to assist with post-issuance debt compliance requirements.

Technology Control Plan (TCP)

A document that sets forth the specific physical, electronic and procedural controls that will be taken to prevent unauthorized access to or export of controlled technology. (A template TCP is available on the forms page of the Office of Export Controls website.)

Telecommuting

A work arrangement in which supervisors direct or permit employees to perform their usual job duties away from their central workplace.

Telecommuting

A work arrangement in which supervisors direct or permit employees to perform their usual job duties away from their central workplace.

Telecommuting Plan

The required, written agreement between the supervisor and employee that details the terms and conditions of an employee’s work at an alternative work location.

Temporary Quarters

Lodging or housing in which the employee lives at a reasonable cost until permanent residence is secured, or up to ninety (90) days. Temporary quarters can consist of any type of lodging including hotels, motels, apartments, or single family dwellings.

Tent

A structure, enclosure or shelter, with or without side-walls or drops, constructed of fabric or pliable material supported by any manner except by air or the contents that it protects.

Tenure or "Without Term" Election

An appointment to the faculty of indefinite duration.

Terms

There are no terms that require definition.

Text Messages

Brief, direct notifications received on a cellular phone or similar text-communication handheld device.

Threat Assessment Team

The TAT is the team required by Virginia Code §23.1-805 to implement the University’s assessment, intervention and action protocol.

Timely Warning

An alert triggered when the University determines that a crime which has already been committed but presents a serious or continuous threat (e.g., a homicide, sex offense or robbery) must be reported to the campus community.

Title IX Coordinator

The person charged with monitoring the University’s compliance with Title IX. The term “Title IX Coordinator” means the Title IX Coordinator, any Deputy Title IX Coordinator, and/or any of their respective trained designee(s).

Title IX Policy
To Provide

(Concerning transmitting a document) to place in the mail or to deliver.

Total Professional Effort

All activities performed by a faculty or staff member regardless of how (or whether) the individual receives compensation. All such activities are comprised of both inclusions and exclusions in defining 100% ‘University effort.’ [Reference Appendix A of this policy for further details.]

Trade or Business

Any activity carried on by a Non-Governmental Person other than an individual acting as a member of the general public.

Trademark

Any name, symbol, figure, letter, word, or mark adopted and used by the University in order to designate institutional goods and to distinguish them from those manufactured or sold by others. A trademark is a proprietary term that is usually registered with the Patent and Trademark Office to assure its exclusive use by its owner.

Train the Trainer (TtT)

The designated department trainer who has the knowledge, classroom training certification and experience to train others on how to safely operate the powered industrial truck used in the department. The TtT is responsible for investigating any incident that may occur with the department’s PIT and resolving how to prevent any future reoccurrence.

Travel Abroad Health and Emergency Assistance Insurance

Insurance that provides coverage for health care costs incurred overseas and that provides (1) medical evacuation, (2) security evacuation, (3) repatriation of remains, and (4) emergency assistance. The required aggregate minimum coverage is determined by the Office of Property & Liability Risk Management, the Risk Management Committee for Education Abroad, and the Office of University Counsel.

Travel Advance Funds

Special cash advances or other funds from the University that would be “loaned” out to the employee for reimbursement to the University at a later time.

Travel Card Coordinator

The UVa Administrator of the Travel Card Program. Contact information for this individual may be found on the Accounting Services website.

Travel Meals

Meals for which an individual may be reimbursed for no other reason than that the meal was taken while traveling on approved University business. Travel meal reimbursement may be claimed only for the traveler, not for others who may be present.

Travel Registry

A confidential and secure database for maintaining key travel information about students traveling for University-related purposes. The travel registry is the official and authoritative source of traveler information that forms the basis for the University’s emergency response protocols and communications strategy (e.g., alerts, warnings, evacuation notices) when responding to an emergency or critical incident abroad. The International Studies Office is responsible for the overall management of the travel registry, though other offices have input and access to the registry for rapid response purposes.

Travel Warnings

The U.S. Department of State’s strongest advisory that is issued when the Department, based on all relevant information, decides to recommend that Americans avoid travel to a certain country.

Tuition adjustment

The amount of tuition above in-state tuition paid on behalf of an out-of-state student serving in a qualified graduate assistantship. An out-of-state student who serves in a qualified graduate assistantship receives tuition remission (in-state tuition and all required fees) and may receive tuition adjustment (difference between in-state and out-of-state tuition; all required fees are covered as part of tuition remission).

Tuition remission

The in-state tuition and all required fees paid on behalf of a student serving in a qualified graduate assistantship. Tuition remission pays only the in-state portion of an out-of-state student’s tuition charges, but pays all required fees, including the comprehensive fee, the University activity fee, the school activity fee, and, where applicable, the international student fee. (Note: This is a University definition and not the Federal definition.)

Types of Affiliation

Includes:

Doctoral Completion: Advanced doctoral students who have fulfilled all residency and credit requirements for their degree, do not require access to University resources  (including labs) or student services, and are completing or defending their dissertation.

External Internship/Study: Students who are participating in an approved professional internship or educational program outside the University.

Degree Conferral in Absentia: Students who are not taking new courses or pursuing research, but who need to be affiliated at the University for certain administrative reasons before receiving their degree, including finishing incompletes, paying an outstanding University financial obligation, or receiving official transcripts of approved transfer credit.

Types of Enrollment

Includes:

Certificate-Seeking: A student who is enrolled in a credit or non-credit certificate program at the University.

Degree-Seeking: A student enrolled in any undergraduate or graduate degree-granting program at the University. Graduate degree-seeking students include those students enrolled in one of the University’s two professional schools (Law, Medicine).

Full-Time: A student who is enrolled for at least twelve (12) credits in a fall or spring term, six (6) credits in summer term, three (3) credits in January term, or a student who is enrolled in the School of Medicine and has been identified by the school as full-time (Medicine does not award credit for its courses).

Part-Time: A student who is enrolled at half-time or less than half-time. Students enrolled for three-quarter time must be approved for a reduced course load by their dean’s office and pay full-time tuition. References in this policy to part-time enrollment do not include three-quarter time enrollment.

Non-Degree-Seeking: A student who has received permission to enroll and is registered for coursework at the University but is not enrolled in one of the University’s degree-granting programs.

Research: A student who is enrolled for graduate research credits only. Research graduate students may be degree-seeking or non-degree-seeking.

Visiting: A non-degree-seeking student who is enrolled in a degree-granting program at another institution.

U.S. Citizen

(1) An individual born in the U.S.; (2) an individual whose parent is a U.S. Citizen; (3) a former alien who has been naturalized as a U.S. citizen; (4) an individual born in Puerto Rico; (5) an individual born in Guam; or (6) an individual born in the U.S. Virgin Islands. (USC 1401 et seq.)

U.S. National

An individual who owes his sole allegiance to the U.S. including all U.S. citizens, and including non-U.S. citizens of certain U.S. possessions including American Samoa and the Northern Mariana Islands. (8 USC 1401 et seq.)

U.S. Public Health Service (PHS)

An operating component of the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS).

Unauthorized Cash Deficit

Any revenue project that is in deficit and either has not been authorized by Treasury Management or exceeds its authorized limit or permitted time frame.

Uncommitted Effort

Any portion of ‘University effort’ devoted to a sponsored activity that is above the amount committed in the proposal and the subsequent award. This ‘extra effort’ is neither pledged explicitly in the proposal nor included in the award documentation as a formal commitment.

  • For Principal Investigators/Project Directors and key personnel, uncommitted effort is not considered cost shared effort. However, the uncommitted effort percentage must be accounted for and documented as part of one’s 100% ‘University effort’ on the periodic effort report (See Procedure 8-31).
     
  • For other contributing personnel, uncommitted effort is considered cost shared effort and must be documented as such in Section I on the periodic effort report (See Procedure 8-31).
Underutilization

Occurs when the University employs fewer females and minorities in a particular job group than would be reasonably expected based on their availability in the relevant geographic recruiting area [per Executive Order No. 11.246 (September 28, 1965)].

Unit

As used throughout this Policy, encompasses schools, departments, and other components of the University.

University

As used throughout this Policy, “University” refers to the University of Virginia, including its Medical Center and the College at Wise.

University Administrative Policy

Policy established under the authority of the Executive Vice President & Chief Operating Officer. Administrative policy covers non-academic support issues. It includes both general administrative policy and area-specific administrative policy (see below).

University Airplane

A Cessna 560XLS+ jet capable of seating up to seven people. The airplane is based at the General Aviation terminal at the Charlottesville-Albemarle Airport.

University Budget Summary

The University’s annual operating budget approved by the Board of Visitors.

University Community

Includes all faculty, staff and students who are formally and officially affiliated with the University through either an employment contract or matriculation.

University Effort

The portion of ‘total professional effort’ that comprises one's professional/professorial workload at UVa, including the Medical Center and UVa at Wise, for which the employee is compensated (through UVa and/or the University Physicians Group - UPG). (See definition of Institutional Base Salary). This includes research, instruction, other sponsored activities, administration, non-sponsored/departmental research, university service, competitive proposal preparation and clinical activities. For the purpose of effort certification, ‘university effort’ totals 100%, regardless of the number of hours worked or the individual’s appointment percentage. (For activities included and excluded from ‘university effort,’ reference Appendix A of policy FIN-027, Time & Effort Certification.)

University Equipment

University owned or leased property used to assist in performing an activity or function (e.g., hand tools, power tools, audio-visual equipment, etc.). University equipment does not include University infrastructure (e.g., networks, buildings, etc.); office furnishings that remain in the location designated for their use (e.g., desks, file cabinets, bookcases, etc.); or telephone and computing resources that are covered by other specific policies.

University Facility

Any defined space of the University, including a room, lab, series of labs, building or controlled outdoor area.

University Function

Any activity that is conducted or sponsored by a University office, department or by University personnel, and is done on behalf of the University, whether the activity is conducted on or off Grounds.

University Funds

All funds appropriated, generated, awarded, donated or otherwise received by the University regardless of their source. The term University Funds does not include Agency Funds that the University maintains for legally separate external student organizations or other entities.

University Grounds

The areas where administrative functions, teaching and research facilities of the University that are used by members of the University community are located as well as athletic and recreational facilities.

University Housing

Residential living areas managed by the University’s Housing Division.

University Keyed System

Lock and Key hardware of specific manufacturer and specification that is managed by the University Facilities Management Lock Shop, and tracked and maintained through the Key Control System.

University of Virginia Employee

Is an individual:

  • Employed with the University’s academic division who is full-time or part-time and receiving employee benefits.
  • Hired as a wage employee (faculty, adjunct faculty, part-time classified, post-doc, and wage) to work 1500 hours or less per year with the University’s academic division and receiving no employee benefits.
University of Virginia Student

An individual who is enrolled in a degree program or a summer session program.

University of Virginia Web page

A page created or maintained by or on behalf of the University of Virginia or an office, department, or division of the University of Virginia and located within the University of Virginia's information technology environment, i.e., signified by the address \virginia.edu\" or within the range of Internet protocol addresses assigned to the University of Virginia. [Note: Web page and web site may be used interchangeably.]"

University Office or Department

Any office or department whose reporting line culminates with the Board of Visitors. A student organization with a Contracted Independent Organization Agreement or a Fraternal Organization Agreement, or a University foundation is not considered a University office or department.

University Payment Card Services (UPCS)

An administrative unit within UVAFinance that oversees payment card activity for the Academic Division, the College at Wise, and University-Affiliated Parties.

University Personnel

University employees who have a direct reporting relationship that culminates with the Board of Visitors or who are appointed through University Human Resources and paid through University payroll to perform services that are subject to the will and control of the University.

University Property

Land or buildings that the University owns or leases and that is under the direct control of the Board of Visitors. University property also includes premises the University uses for activities of its offices, departments, personnel or students.

University Purchasing Card

A credit card issued to an authorized individual to make official purchases of small dollar goods and services (that do not require competitive bidding) quickly and directly. (Also referred to as the “P-Card,” the “Procurement Card.”)

University Records

Recorded information that documents a transaction or activity by or with any appointed board member, officer, or employee of the University. Regardless of physical form or characteristic, the recorded information is a University record if it is produced, collected, received or retained in pursuance of law or in connection with the transaction of university business. The medium upon which such information is recorded has no bearing on the determination of whether the recording is a University record. University records include but are not limited to: personnel records, student records, research records, financial records, patient records and administrative records. Record formats/media include but are not limited to: email, electronic databases, electronic files, paper, audio, video and images (photographs).

University Research

Research and related activities by any person, which are related in any way to duties or responsibilities for which he/she has been compensated either by or through the University; or for which facilities owned, operated, or controlled by the University are used. Products of research eligible for copyright protection are excluded from this definition. Modification of this definition of University research may be effected by the terms of a contract between the University and another public or private agency or, in exceptional circumstances, in the patent agreement with an individual University researcher.

University Staff Employees (University Staff)

Those salaried, non-faculty employees hired on or after July 1, 2006, and those salaried non-faculty employees and administrative and professional faculty electing to participate in the University Human Resources System established by the Board of Visitors under the authority granted by the Restructuring Act and the Management Agreement. (The term “University Staff Employee” includes all three categories of University Staff Employees - Operational & Administrative, Managerial & Professional, and Executive & Senior Administrative.)

University Travel and Expense Card

A credit card issued to an authorized individual to make official purchases of small dollar goods and services, travel, meals, and entertainment (that do not require competitive bidding) quickly and directly.

University Travel Restrictions

A restriction on student or GME trainee travel issued by ISO under direction of the vice provost for global affairs and published on the ISO website. A University Travel Restriction may limit student or GME trainee travel to a region or prohibit student or GME trainee travel to the region. See the policy statement below for a list of the types of situations that could result in the issuance of a University Travel Restriction.

University Units

Schools and departments within the University, typically represented by a five digit numeric code (i.e., organization code) in the University’s Integrated System.

University's Standard Hours of Work and Workweek

The standard hours of work are 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., including a one-hour lunch period each Monday through Friday. The standard workweek begins at 12:01 a.m. Monday and ends at 12:00 midnight the following Sunday.

University-Affiliated Party

An entity other than a unit of the Academic Division, the Medical Center, or the College at Wise authorized to collect funds to support the University’s activities, units, or mission and that has agreed to comply with the terms of this policy. This may include but is not limited to University-Related Foundations, contract vendors, and student organizations.

University-Related Foundation (Foundation)

An organization that is created and operated exclusively to benefit the University or one or more of the University's units. It is a separate legal entity that has been approved and designated by the Board of Visitors as a Foundation and is subject to this policy. (All references in this Policy of the Board of Visitors shall include subsidiaries and affiliates of University-Related Foundations as well as the Foundations themselves.)

University–Owned Vehicle

A vehicle that is licensed for road use and is owned by the University as evidenced by the vehicle’s title, registration, and license plate (normally light blue in color with an S as the last digit), regardless of the source of the funding the University used to purchase the vehicle, or whether the vehicle was acquired through donation in accordance with University Policy IX.A.11 Gift in Kind Policies.

University–Related Foundation Function

Any activity that is conducted or sponsored by a University-Related Foundation office, department or by University-Related Foundation personnel, and is done on behalf of the University, whether the activity is conducted on or off Grounds.

University–Related Foundation Office or Department

Any office or department whose reporting line culminates with a University-Related Foundation board.

University’s Standard Hours of Work and Workweek

The standard hours of work are 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., including a one-hour lunch period each Monday through Friday. The standard workweek begins at 12:01 a.m. Monday and ends at 12:00 midnight the following Sunday.

Unmanned Aircraft

An aircraft that is operated without direct human intervention from within or on the aircraft.

Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS)

An unmanned aircraft and associated elements (including communication links and the components that control the unmanned aircraft) that are required for the Remote Pilot in Command to operate safely and efficiently in the national airspace system.

Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Operations Manager

Individual designated by the University with responsibility for coordination of flights, submission of reports, and management of all UAS operations.

Unpaid Faculty Appointment

Appointments that do not involve payment of salary or other compensation but do provide an academic rank.

UVa Job Structure

A standardized set of approved UVa job titles for use across Grounds. Titles are grouped by job families, divided into sub-families, and broken down by title. Each title has a summary sheet that defines the key information associated with each title, including typical work, typical education and experience, typical expertise, market matches, pay range, and the compliance coding.

UVa Job Title

The descriptive title assigned to a group of positions whose duties and responsibilities are the same kind of work, at a similar skill and responsibility level, requiring substantially the same qualifications. A single pay range, based on market data, is assigned to each UVa Job Title.

UVA Market Place

The University’s primary purchasing system for entering electronic catalog and non-catalog orders and creating requisitions for purchase by Procurement and Supplier Diversity Services (PSDS).

UVA–WorkMed

A comprehensive occupational health and employee wellness program.

Vaping

Drawing in and exhaling an aerosol, commonly called vapor; the act of using an electronic cigarette.

Vendor

Any entity that supplies goods or services.

Visa
A document that allows a nonimmigrant alien from a foreign country to travel to a U.S. port-of entry, and request permission of the U.S. immigration inspector to enter the U.S. Issuance of a visa does not guarantee entry to the U.S. The CBP Officer at the port-of-entry determines whether the nonimmigrant alien can be admitted and decides how long the nonimmigrant alien may stay for any particular visit.
 
B-1 and B-2 Visas:
The most common nonimmigrant visa also known as the “visa for temporary visitors for business or pleasure” is used for persons desiring to enter the U. S. temporarily for Business (B-1) or for pleasure, tourism or medical treatment (B-2). Business reasons include “usual academic activity or activities” such as lecturing; attending meetings; and sharing knowledge, experience, or skills in master classes, readings, and performances.
 
J-1 Visa:
Nonimmigrant visa issued by the U.S. to exchange visitors participating in programs that promote cultural exchange, especially to obtain medical, scientific, or educational training within the U.S. J-1 visitors may remain in the U.S. until the end of their exchange program, as specified on form DS-2019.
 
Visa Waiver Program (VWP)

Enables citizens of 36 participating countries meeting the Visa Waiver Program requirements to travel to the U. S. for business or tourism (visitor [B] visa purposes only) for stays of 90 days or less without obtaining a visa. Nonimmigrant alien visitors cannot extend their stay.

Visiting Appointment

An appointment at another institution or organization for a short term, usually one year or less, during which time the faculty member is on leave from the University.

Visiting Faculty

Visiting faculty visit the University for a short term, usually one year or less, while on leave from another institution of higher education. During their appointment at the University, they hold professorial rank commensurate with the rank they hold at their home institution. Visiting faculty may serve with or without pay.

Visiting Faculty and Staff

An individual working on a temporary basis at the University and not receiving compensation from the University's academic division.  (Examples of visiting faculty and staff include, but are not limited to: visiting research assistants, visiting scholars and ROTC.)

Visiting Graduate Student

A non-degree-seeking student who is enrolled in a graduate degree-granting program at another institution.

Visiting Scholar

Visiting scholars are appointed, often for short terms, so that they may participate in scholarly or research activities in a sponsoring department or school. They serve without pay except with the written approval of the executive vice president and provost. They do not participate formally in instruction. Individuals who participate formally in instruction should be appointed as visiting faculty, if appropriate, or as lecturers.

Visiting Student

A non-degree-seeking student who is enrolled in a degree-granting program at another institution.

Visual Line of Sight

The ability of the Remote Pilot in Command to see the aircraft at all times when in flight using the unaided eye with sufficient clarity to determine the aircraft’s location, attitude, altitude, and direction of flight, and to avoid other aircraft or hazards.

Visual Observer

A person who has been designated to assist the Remote Pilot in Command in complying with his or her See and Avoid duties and maintain a lookout for other aircraft or hazards that may affect the safety of flight.

Volunteer

An individual permitted under specific conditions to perform activities on behalf of the University, but who is not an employee of the University of Virginia and, therefore, is not generally entitled to the benefits granted to employees.

VWB and VWT

VWB (Visa Waiver for Business) and VWT (Visa Waiver for Tourism) travelers are required to have a valid authorization through the Electronic System for Travel (ESTA) prior to travel to a U.S. port-of-entry.

Wage Employee

An employee whose terms and conditions of employment stipulate an hourly rate of pay rather than a fixed salary and who is paid on an hourly basis for actual hours worked. Wage employees are not eligible for leave or other benefits. These employees are not covered by the Virginia Personnel Act and are non-exempt for purposes of overtime compensation as defined by the Fair Labor Standards Act.

Waste Stream

Waste materials generated in UVa facilities that can be recovered for reuse, recycled or disposed in a landfill as solid waste.

Weapon

Any (i) firearm including any pistol, revolver, rifle, shotgun, air-pistol, paintball gun, or other instrument designed or intended to propel a bullet, cartridge, or other missile of any kind including a bow or cross-bow; (ii) dirk, bowie knife, switchblade knife, ballistic knife, butterfly knife, sword, machete, or other bladed weapon with a blade longer than four inches in length; (iii) razor slingshot, spring stick, metal or lexan knucks, or blackjack; (iv) flailing instrument consisting of two or more rigid parts connected in such manner as to allow them to swing freely, which may be known as nun chahka, nun chuck, nunchaku, shuriken, or fighting chain; or (v) disc, of whatever configuration, having at least two points or pointed blades that is designed to be thrown or propelled and that may be known as throwing star or oriental dart.

Whistleblower

Person who makes an allegation of research misconduct.

Wire Transfer

The direct, electronic transfer of funds from one bank account to another, using the Federal Reserve Bank’s FedWire System as an intermediary.

With Term

An appoinment of a defined duration and end date.

Women-owned Business Enterprise

A business that is at least 51 percent owned by one or more women who are U.S. citizens or legal resident aliens, or in the case of a corporation, partnership, or limited liability company or other entity, at least 51 percent of the equity ownership interest is owned by one or more women who are U.S. citizens or legal resident aliens, and both the management and daily business operations are controlled by one or more women.

Work Area

The area where work with any hazardous material could contaminate work surfaces, release airborne particles, mists or vapors or other means by which materials could spread with or without the knowledge of laboratory personnel or others in the area.

Work Schedule

The employee’s hours of work in the central workplace or in alternative work locations.

Working Capital

The operating liquidity available to an organization to meet financial obligations.

Working Time

The hours during which an employee is expected to be performing his/her University-related job responsibilities. 

Worksite Evaluations

Assessment of the workplace in order to improve the fit between the worker and the work environment.

Work–for–Hire Rule

The “work-for-hire” rule, defined in the Copyright Act, provides that when an employee produces a copyrightable work within the scope of employment, the copyright to that work belongs to the employer and not to the author.

Write-off

A transaction that removes from the University’s financial accounting records a receivable that management has determined to be uncollectible. Writing off the receivable does not relieve the debt; it remains owed to the University, but is no longer reported in the University’s accounting system as a receivable.

Write-off Committee

The Write-off Committee meets on a quarterly basis to review receivable balances proposed for write-off by billing departments, Central AR, and SFS to ensure that due diligence procedures have been completed. The Write-off Committee approves or disapproves write-offs based on the facts and circumstances of each account. The Write-off Committee is comprised of the University Comptroller or his designee, the Assistant Vice President for Student Financial Services or his designee, and other appointed Finance and SFS staff.

Zero Mechanical State

The mechanical potential energy of all portions of the equipment or machine is set so that the opening of pipes, tubes, hoses or actuation of any valve, lever or button, will not produce a movement which could cause injury.